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John Swaney (1806 - 1870)

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John Swaney
Born in Crawford, Pennsylvaniamap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married in Crawford, Pennsylvaniamap
Descendants descendants
Died in Old Mission, Grand Traverse, Michiganmap
Profile manager: Bill Rankin private message [send private message]
Swaney-80 created
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Contents

Biography

This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import. It's a rough draft and needs to be edited.

Birth

Birth:
Date: 13 Sep 1806
Place: Crawford, Pennsylvania[1][2]

Death

Death:
Date: 4 Oct 1870
Place: Old Mission, Grand Traverse, Michigan[3][4][5]

Burial

Burial:
Place: Mapleton, Grand Traverse, Michigan[6]

Occupation

Occupation: Farmer[7][8][9]

Residence

Residence:
Date: 1850
Place: Spring Twp., Crawford, Pennsylvania[10]
Residence:
Date: 1860
Place: Peninsula Twp., Grand Traverse, Michigan[11]
Residence:
Date: 1870
Place: Old Mission, Grand Traverse, Michigan[12]
Residence:
Date: 16 Aug 1870
Place: Old Mission, Grand Traverse, Michigan[13]

Event

Event: Paralytic Stroke
Type: Cause of Death
Place: Old Mission, Grand Traverse, Michigan
Event: Ogdensburg Cemetery
Type: Cemetery
Place: Mapleton, Grand Traverse, Michigan[14]

Data Changed

Data Changed:
Date: 20 Aug 2013
Time: 14:04

Prior to import, this record was last changed 14:04 20 Aug 2013.

Note

Note: #NI1302

Marriage

Husband: John Swaney
Wife: Rosannah McFadden
Marriage:
Date: 24 Jun 1835
Place: Crawford, Pennsylvania[15]
Child: Christopher Columbus Swaney
Child: Mary Swaney
Child: Nancy Ann Swaney
Child: Lawrence Swaney
Child: Belinda Catherine Swaney
Child: Emily Basille Swaney
Child: Manasses Swaney
Child: Rosannah Swaney
Child: John B. Swaney
Child: James Swaney
Child: Margaret Helen Swaney
Data Changed:
Date: 20 Mar 2011
Time: 11:07

Sources

  • Source: S217 Media: Cemetery Abbreviation: Cemetery Headstones Title: Cemetery Headstones
  • Source: S237 Abbreviation: 1870 United States Federal Census Title: 1870 U.S. census, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, Provo, Utah, Digital images Publication: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.
  • Source: S243 Abbreviation: 1850 United States Federal Census Title: 1850 U.S. census, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, Provo, Utah, Digital images Publication: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.
  • Source: S244 Abbreviation: 1860 United States Federal Census Title: 1860 U.S. census, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, Provo, Utah, Digital images Publication: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.
  • Source: S403 Abbreviation: Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney; a family history prepared for the swaney family reunion of 1982. ; photocopy Title: The Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney; a family history prepared for the swaney family reunion of 1982. ; photocopy Author: George Beckett
  • Source: S415 Abbreviation: Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850 - 1880 Title: Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850 - 1880 Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Database online. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Repository: #R15
  • Repository: R15 Name: n/a Address: n/a Name: n/a
  • Source: S436 Abbreviation: Michigan Deaths, 1867 - 1897 Title: Michigan Deaths, 1867 - 1897 Author: Michigan Vital Records Index Publication: Digital image online, FamilySearch Historical Records, FamilySearch http://familysearch.org/. Michigan Department of Vital Records, Lansing, Michigan. FHL microfilm, 42 reels. Salt Lake City, Utah.

Notes

Note NI1302The Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney compiled by George E. Beckett.
This family history was prepared for the Swaney Family Reunion of 1982.
John Swaney was born on September 13, 1806. He inherited 100 acres of the old homestead and on June 24, 1835 at the residence of her parents he married Miss Rosannah McFadden. Rosannah was born on the 10th of July, 1810. John took his bride back to Crossingville and the following year their first child was born. By early 1849 they had 9 children, and Rosannah found herself with child once again. Why they decided to come to Michigan no one may ever know. Our best guess is John wanted his sons to have land of their own. With four boys at home and another baby on the way he didn't believe his 100 acres would be enough to go around. For whatever reason, in the fall of 1850 the family boarded a steamship in Erie and headed up the Great Lakes.
In 1829 the county of Crawford had rearranged the township boundaries and those descendents of John Swaney, Sr. found themselves in the new township of Spring. This accounts for documentation here in Michigan that the Swaneys were from Spring Township, not Cusswego. In 1850, the steamship lines were sending three ships a week to Chicago. They were fairly comfortable with sofas and stuffed chairs complete with saloon. With luck the ships could make 700 miles in 50 hours. To make a trip from Buffalo to Chicago the ships required 600 cords of wood. They would make periodic stops along the Great Lakes to "wood up" usually taking on 100 cords a stop at a dollar per cord. Mackinaw was one such stop. It was at Mackinaw John and his family left the steamer and boarded a sloop for Grand Traverse Bay.
As they neared the shore any animals would have to be pushed overboard as there were no docks at that time. Indians met incoming ships with canoes to unload passengers and freight. When John and Rosannah arrived at Old Mission there were two other white families and about 500 Indians. They built a primitive cabin from slab wood to shelter them their first winter and eventually a farmhouse near "Swaney Lake".
John claimed 160 acres and his eldest son, Chris, 160 directly to the north of his. Lawrence, his second son, claimed approximately 80 acres on east bay south of the Mission. When they first arrived the government had not yet put the peninsula land on the market but John was contented to wait and in 1860 officially bought his land for .25 per acre.
John and Rosannah had another child after coming to Michigan. In 1852, a girl, Margaret Helen, was born; however, she died shortly after her second birthday in 1854. At harvest time in 1868, John and his sons were operating a horse driven threshing machine in the barn. Rosannah went out to call the men in for lunch. As she stepped over the connecting rod the long dress she was wearing was caught up in the machinery and she was thrown several times against the floor crushing her skull. She clung to life for three days after the accident and died September 2, 1868.
The following year John suffered a paralytic stroke and never really recovered. He died October 4, 1870. These pioneers of Old Mission had eleven children. We are their progeny.
from The Sprague Database; http://www.sprague-database.org/
Published in 1907 by the Edinboro Independent, Edinboro, Pa.
On the 4th day of June, 1798, John, Morgan and Alexander Swaney. Patrick Harkins, Bartholomew McBride, Patrick McBride, Daniel McBride, John Hageny, and Miles Tinny came to Londonderry (Derry), Ireland and sailed the following day for the United States. The voyage was rough and tempestuous, lasting fourteen weeks. When three days out the main mast was carried away and so violent did the storm become that it was necessary to throw great quantities of stores and provisions overboard to keep the vessel afloat. When on the verge of dispair drifting at the mercy of the winds and starvation staring them in the face, they were rescued by a friendly vessel and towed into the harbor at Philadelphia.
Leaving Philadelphia, they pushed inland as far as Northumberland County where the mother of William and Leroy Swaney was born. Leaving the women and as far a Northumberland County where the mother of William and Leroy Swaney was born. Leaving the women and children behind them the men (including John Chamberline and John Clauson, who were reportedly bother-in-laws) turned their steps westward. Reaching Pittsburg, they continued as far as Meadville. Here a Mr. Huidekooper, and agent for the Holland Land Company, directed them to Cussewago Township. It was then October. It was possible to obtain 400 acres of land at $.20 an acre provided a building was erected and some indication was made that the person intended to occupy the land. Before leaving Meadville a quantity of salt was purchased at REF_NOTES.25 a quarter and on the way to Cussewago it is recorded John Swaney carried a gun and ammunition. Each of the men took up land and the cabin building began. Crossing the creek, the hardy pioneers put up a cabin for Morgan Swaney on what was once called Tinny's farm, now owned by Robert Clemens. Another cabin was built for John Swaney on land now owned by James and Alexander Swaney. They then built a cabin for Alexander Swaney on the farm now owned by Serelus Swaney.
Having built their cabins, thus strengthening their titles to the land, they rejoined their familes in North Cumberland County remaining there for 2 years. It was during this period that Morgan Swaney was killed by a falling tree. In April, 1800 a fresh start was made for Cussewago. The procession this time consisted of the men, their wives and children, two yoke of oxen, a wagon and a cart. Edward Swaney, John's son (born 1787) and father of William and Leroy Swaney, drove one of the teams, though at the time he was only 8 years old. Sarah Anne Harkins drove the other team. They came by way of Pittsburg and Meadville. It took them three days to come from the latter place to Crossingville. The men were kept busy cutting a way trough the woods for the oxen to travel. Of their worldly possessions the following illustration may serve as an example: The grandparents of William Swaney began housekeeping with a half bushel measure packed to the brim with linen, a steelyar, and one flatiron. It may be interesting to know that these articles are now in the possession of Wiliam Swaney.
Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880
20 Sep 1870 record forJohn Swaney
His farm consisted of 25 acres under cultivation and 15 acres of woodland, 4 horses, 3 milk cows, 6 cattle, and 5 swine. He had 125 bushels of winter wheat, 250 bushels of Indian corn, 200 bushels of oats, and 80 bushels of buckwheat.
  1. Source: #S403
  2. Source: #S217 Page: Personal photograph of headstone for John Swaney, Died Oct 4, 1870, Ogdensburg Cemetery, Mapleton, Grand Traverse Co., Michigan Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  3. Source: #S403
  4. Source: #S436 Page: Record 18. Death index for John Swaney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  5. Source: #S217 Page: Personal photograph of headstone for John Swaney, Died Oct 4, 1870, Ogdensburg Cemetery, Mapleton, Grand Traverse Co., Michigan Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  6. Source: #S217 Page: Personal photograph of headstone for John Swaney, Died Oct 4, 1870, Ogdensburg Cemetery, Mapleton, Grand Traverse Co., Michigan Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  7. Source: #S243 Page: M432, roll 770, Spring Twp., Crawford Co., Pennsylvania, p. 2, dwelling 15, family 15, John Swaney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  8. Source: #S244 Page: M653, roll 543, Peninsula Twp., Grand Traverse Co., Michigan, p. 35, dwelling 355, family 245, John Sveeney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  9. Source: #S237 Page: M593, roll 672, Old Mission, Grand Traverse Co., Michigan, p. 4, dwelling 25, family 27, John Swaney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  10. Source: #S243 Page: M432, roll 770, Spring Twp., Crawford Co., Pennsylvania, p. 2, dwelling 15, family 15, John Swaney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  11. Source: #S244 Page: M653, roll 543, Peninsula Twp., Grand Traverse Co., Michigan, p. 35, dwelling 355, family 245, John Sveeney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  12. Source: #S237 Page: M593, roll 672, Old Mission, Grand Traverse Co., Michigan, p. 4, dwelling 25, family 27, John Swaney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  13. Source: #S415 Page: 16 Aug 1870, Peninsula Twp., Old Mission, Grand Traverse, Michigan; Archive Collection Number: T1164; Roll: 18; Page: 1; Line: 23; Schedule Type: Agriculture. Record for John Swaney Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  14. Source: #S217 Page: Personal photograph of headstone for John Swaney, Died Oct 4, 1870, Ogdensburg Cemetery, Mapleton, Grand Traverse Co., Michigan Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  15. Source: #S403

Acknowledgments

Thank you to Bill Rankin for creating WikiTree profile Swaney-80 through the import of James Rankin to Me.ged on Sep 10, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Bill and others.




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