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John Swaney (1763 - 1840)

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John Swaney
Born in Kilmacrenan Co. Donegal Irelandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Father of
Died in Crossingville, Crawford, Pennsylvaniamap
Profile manager: Bill Rankin private message [send private message]
Swaney-97 created
This page has been accessed 698 times.

Contents

Biography

This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import. It's a rough draft and needs to be edited.

Birth

Birth:
Date: 1763
Place: Kilmacrenan Co. Donegal Ireland[1][2]

Death

Death:
Date: 4 Dec 1840
Place: Crossingville, Crawford, Pennsylvania[3][4]

Burial

Burial:
Place: Crossingville, Crawford, Pennsylvania[5]

Event

Event: Saint James Cemetery
Type: Cemetery
Place: Crossingville, Crawford, Pennsylvania[6]

Data Changed

Data Changed:
Date: 20 Aug 2013
Time: 14:04

Prior to import, this record was last changed 14:04 20 Aug 2013.

Note

Note: #NI2610

Sources

  • Source: S403 Abbreviation: Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney; a family history prepared for the swaney family reunion of 1982. ; photocopy Title: The Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney; a family history prepared for the swaney family reunion of 1982. ; photocopy Author: George Beckett
  • Source: S563 Media: Internet Web Page Abbreviation: FindAGrave.com Title: FindAGrave.com Publication: Find A Grave.com; http://www.findagrave.com

Notes

Note NI2610The Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney compiled by George E. Beckett.
This family history was prepared for the Swaney Family Reunion of 1982.
The following information was acquired from "A Short History of St. Phillips Church", 1907, Edinboro Independent, Edinboro, Pennsylvania
On the 4th day of June, 1798, John, Morgan, and Alexander Swaney came to Londonderry (Derry), Ireland and sailed the following day for the United States. The voyage was rough and tempestuous, lasting fourteen weeks. When three days out the main mast was carried away and so violent did the storm become that it was necessary to throw great quantities of stores and provisions overboard to keep the vessel afloat. When on the verge of despair drifting at the mercy of the winds and starvation staring them in the face, they were rescued by a friendly vessel and towed into the harbor at Philadelphia.
Leaving Philadelphia, they pushed inland as far as North Cumberland County. Leaving the women and children behind them the men turned their steps westward. Reaching Pittsburg, they continued as far as Meadville. Here a Mr. Huidekooper, an agent for the Holland Land Company, directed them to Cussewago Township. It was possible to obtain 400 acres of land at 20Ù! an acre provided a building was erected and some indication was made that the person intended to occupy the land. Before leaving Meadville a quantity of salt was purchased at 25Ù! a quarter and on the way to Cussewago it is recorded John Swaney carried a gun and ammunition. Each of the men took up land and the cabin building began. The Swaneys had come from Ireland with several other families. The men from these families accompanied the Swaney brothers to Cussewago Township and also built cabins.
Having built their cabins, thus strengthening their titles to the land, they rejoined their families in North Cumberland County remaining there for 2 years. It was during this period that Morgan Swaney was killed by a falling tree. In April, 1800, a fresh start was made for Cussewago. The procession this time consisted of the men, their wives and children, two yoke of oxen, a wagon and a cart. Edward Swaney, John's son (born 1787 in Ireland) drove one of the teams, though at the time he was only 13 years old. Alexander's future wife, Sarah Ann Harkins, drove the other team. The journey was a hard one. It took three days to come from Meadville to Crossingville, a distance of 17 miles. The men were kept busy cutting a way through the woods for the oxen to travel.
Of their worldly possessions, John and Bridget Swaney began housekeeping with a half bushel measure packed to the brim with linen, a steelyard and one flat iron.
The Descendants of John and Rosannah Swaney compiled by George E. Beckett.
This family history was prepared for the Swaney Family Reunion of 1982.
As we know John Swaney was in the War of 1812 as a private under Lieut; Thomas Hartford's Company 138th Regiment Pennsylvania Militia. He was paid at a rate of per month, a total of .33 for his 1 month, 15 days of service. The National Archives in Washington D. C. houses a handwritten document by John himself instructing the paymaster as to where his pay should be sent.
Crawford County, Pennsylvania is the first real home of our family. Driving through it one might mistake it for northern Michigan. In 1795, John and Bridget Swaney, his brother, Alexander and his wife, Sarah (Hawkins) Swaney, along with two brothers- in-law and their families joined a group of Irish immigrants and came to America. After a three year residence in North Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, they came in the spring of the year to Cussewago Township, Crawford County. Crossingville, situated in the northwestern part of the township was the home of the Swaney family. It was first called Cussewago Crossing so called from the Indian trail that crossed the creek there. The Swaneys donated land for the first church to be built upon in 1833. A hewn log building, it was later replaced in 1848 by the present structure in Crossingville. The old site became St. James Cemetery.
As mentioned, John, Alexander, two brothers-in-law and their families came to Crawford County in 1798. They claimed 1600 acres, 400 a piece. Both John Swaney and Edward H. Swaney (Alexander's son) were veterans of the War of 1812. John was a short timer serving in the 138th Pennsylvania Militia from January 1, 1814 to February 11, 1814. One finds even this hard to believe when one realizes he was 51 years old at the time! It appears he had married Bridget before leaving Ireland and had some children before coming to America. They, too, had a large family of 12 or 13 children.
  1. Source: #S403
  2. Source: #S563 Page: Cemetery record for John Swaney ( 1763 - Dec. 4, 1840 ) Saint James Cemetery, Crossingville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Find A Grave Memorial # 29879037 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  3. Source: #S403
  4. Source: #S563 Page: Cemetery record for John Swaney ( 1763 - Dec. 4, 1840 ) Saint James Cemetery, Crossingville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Find A Grave Memorial # 29879037 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  5. Source: #S563 Page: Cemetery record for John Swaney ( 1763 - Dec. 4, 1840 ) Saint James Cemetery, Crossingville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Find A Grave Memorial # 29879037 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  6. Source: #S563 Page: Cemetery record for John Swaney ( 1763 - Dec. 4, 1840 ) Saint James Cemetery, Crossingville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Find A Grave Memorial # 29879037 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3

Acknowledgments

Thank you to Bill Rankin for creating WikiTree profile Swaney-97 through the import of James Rankin to Me.ged on Sep 10, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Bill and others.




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