Richard Thorley
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Richard Thorley (abt. 1606 - 1685)

Richard Thorley aka Thurley, Thurlo, Thurloe, Thurloo, Thurlow, Thurly, Thirlo, Thirloe, Thirlow, Thurla, Thorla
Born about in Yorkshire, Englandmap [uncertain]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Provincemap
Profile last modified | Created 28 Oct 2011
This page has been accessed 1,432 times.

Biography

In 1638 Richard and Jane sailed on the John of London from Hull as one of the families who were followers of Rev. Ezekiel Rogers who settled Rowley, Massachusetts.

In 1643 Richard had a two acre lot in Rowley. Richard and Jane sold their Rowley property in 1651 to Capt. John Johnson and moved to Newbury and lived north of the Parker River in the area of Dummer Academy. On 1 Dec.1651 Matthew and Sarah Chaffey of Boston sold to Richard for £155 a 400 acre farm in Newbury bounded by Carb Creek. He had a grant of land over the Newbury River in 1653 and built a bridge over the river and the General Court fixed a toll rate for animals only on 3 May 1654. On 27 Jan.1669 Richard and Jane gave part of their farm to their son Thomas, to fall to his son Francis in case Thomas died.[1]

Emigrated from England in 1639 and was one of the first settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts. Death record in Newbury Vital Records. Marriage record in Torrey.

The first settlers of Rowley were a group of twenty families from Rowley, England, near Hull in Yorkshire who came in the company of their Rector, Mr. Rogers. They arrived in America in 1638 and wintered over, possibly in Boston, before joining with sixty other families to settle Rowley, Massachusetts. Whether Richard Tharley was in the group from Rowley, or among the additional immigrants we do not know, but he settled in Rowley in 1639.

In 1651 Richard and his family moved to Newbury where they bought the 400 acre farm of Dr. John Clark on the banks of the Parker River. By 1654 Richard Thorla had built a bridge over the Parker River and was allowed by the General Court to collect tolls. This was the only bridge over the Parker River until 1759 when the Turnpike (now Route 1A) Bridge was built.

According to Richardson, The Tenney Family of...Rowley, MA., Register, 151, pp.329-341, most of the original settlers of Rowley came from Rowley, Yorkshire. This has been difficult to prove since the parish registers of Rowley, Yorks, have not survived. However the Bishop's transcripts for the same period are now available on microfilm through the Family History Library in Salt Lake City (FHL microfilm 919,436, including 1605, 1607, 1620-1624, 1630-1640). This is an avenue worth pursuing for the origins of Richard Tharley.

"... Richard Thorley (now Thurlow). Sold out, and in 1651 was of Newbury with wife Jane. " page x; Town Records of Rowley

“ To Richard Thorlay, one house lott containinge two acrees, bounded on the west side by Mr. Edward Carleton’s house lott, and the south end by the streete." page 128, Holmes Streete, [Rowley, MA]

Sources

History of Rowley ...The history of Rowley : anciently including Bradford, Boxford, and Georgetown, from the year 1639 to the present time by Thomas Gage


  1. Snow-Estes Ancestry- Myrtle Jillson, Hillburn, NY, 1939- Vol. I, pp. 131-2
  • Early Settlers of Rowley- George Blodgette & Amos Jewett, Rowley, 1933- pp. 382-3


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