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Richard Waring (abt. 1634 - abt. 1699)

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Richard Waring aka Waringe, Wareing, Warring, Warren, Waren
Born about in London, Englandmap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married about in Brookhaven, East Riding, Yorkshire, Province of New Yorkmap
Descendants descendants
Died about in Cold Spring, Oyster Bay, Suffolk, Province of New Yorkmap
Profile last modified | Created 24 Jan 2013
This page has been accessed 3,194 times.

Categories: Waring Name Study | Oyster Bay, New York.

Contents

Biography

Disproven Parentage -- Christopher Warren and Alice Webbe

Many genealogies, including "A Short History of the Warings" and "An American Family Called Warren," have claimed that Richard Waring of Brookhaven and Oyster Bay, Long Island was a son of Christopher Warren (Waring) and Alice Webbe.[1][2][3] Christopher and Alice did have a son Richard, who married Elizabeth Ivatt Marsh about 1645, and whose first two sons shared the same names as the first two sons of Richard Waring of Brookhaven (Richard and John). But examination of records contemporaneous to the time period make it clear that Richard, the son of Christopher and Alice, remained in England, and thus could not have been the Richard Waring who lived in Brookhaven and Oyster Bay.[4]

Actual Parentage -- Michael Waring and Judith Cowley

From various letters in the Winthrop Papers that were analyzed by Donald Lines Jacobus, we know that (i) Richard Waring had a sister named Katherine (or Catherine), (ii) Richard Waring and his sister Katherine had an uncle named Richard who lived in London in 1658 (thus ruling out a father named Richard), and (iii) Richard and Katherine's father died before 1658.[5]

The first records found for Katherine in New England are letters in the Winthrop Papers describing Katherine as "sojourning" (apparently romantically) with John Yongs' son in 1649[6] and later indicating that she married a man named Thomas Doxey in early 1650.[7] Based on the date of Katherine's marriage, we can surmise that that she was perhaps most likely born sometime in 1622-1632.

There are no records of Richard Waring until 1657 or, more definitely, 1659. "A History of Long Island" shows the name Richard Waring (as well as that of his sister's second husband, Daniel Lane) in a list of inhabitants of Brookhaven in 1657.[8] However, the original source for this list has not been found and there is reason to believe that the dating may be somewhat off. More reliably, there is a record of Richard Waring, in partnership with a William Chapell, buying a house-lot on New Street in New London in 1659.[9] Since Richard probably had to be at least 21 years old in order to transfer real property, Richard was probably born sometime in or before 1638.

A search of the ancestry.com databases for women named Katherine Waring (exact, sounds alike and similar) born in England in 1622-1632 finds only 2 women: (1) Katharine Waring, bpt. 19 Feb 1630, at St Olave, Hart Street, London; and (2) Catherine Waringe, bpt. 30 June 1625 in Standish, Lancashire. Candidate (2) can be discarded because her father's name was Richard, leaving only two candidates.

A search of the ancestry.com databases for men named Richard Waring (exact, sounds alike and similar) born in England in 1630-1640 finds a significant number of matches, but, most significantly, finds a Richard Wareinge, bpt. 1 Jan 1635 at St Olave, Hart Street, London. The ancestry.com records for the Katharine Waring and Richard Wareinge baptized at St. Olave list the parents of both as Michael and Judith Waring.

The published Registers of St. Olave show that Michael and Judith Waring had 12 children who were baptized at St. Olave from 1624-1637. The Registers also show that Michael Waring was buried there in 1638 and his wife, Judith, was buried there in 1644.[10]

Michael Waring had a brother named Richard who lived in London, as well as a brother and a nephew named Edmund.[11]

The facts listed above provide strong circumstantial evidence that the parents of Richard Waring of Brookhaven and Oyster Bay, Long Island were Michael Waring and Judith (Cowley) Waring of London. In summary:

  • Brookhaven records suggest that Richard Waring was probably born sometime in 1630-1638. Michael and Judith (Cowley) Waring had a son named Richard who was baptized in 1635.
  • Various American records suggest that Richard Waring had a sister named Katherine (or Catherine) who was born sometime in 1620-1630. Michael and Judith Waring had a daughter named Katharine who was baptized in 1629.
  • Richard Waring's sister Katherine sent a letter to an uncle Richard in London in 1658 that indicated that her father had died before that date. Michael Waring had a brother named Richard who lived in London, and both Michael and Judith Waring died before 1658.
  • Richard Waring named two of his sons Michael and Edmund. These names are consistent with the proposed parentage because Michael would have been the name of Richard's father and Edmund the name of an uncle and a cousin.

What clinches Michael Waring and Judith Cowley as Richard's parents, however, is the evidence relating to Michael's brother Richard Waring (referred to here as uncle Richard Waring). As discussed in uncle Richard Waring's profile and below, evidence (largely in the Winthrop Papers) establishes that (i) uncle Richard Waring became acquainted with the Winthrops when he bought Groton Manor from them in 1631, (ii) Richard and Katherine Waring became wards of uncle Richard Waring upon their mother's death in 1644, (iii) uncle Richard Waring offloaded Katherine Waring (and probably Richard Waring) by getting John Winthrop, Jr. to take her to America to be his household servant, and (iv) the Katherine (Waring) Lane and brother Richard Waring who show up in Brookhaven are the same Katherine and Richard Waring who were taken as wards of uncle Richard Waring upon their mother's death.

The theory that Richard Waring of Brookhaven and Oyster Bay was the son of Michael and Judith (Cowley) Waring of London has, in fact, been adopted by several genealogies.[12][13][14]

Date and Place of Birth

Richard Waring of Brookhaven and Oyster Bay, Long Island, the son of Michael and Judith (Cowley) Waring of London, he was baptized at St. Olave, Hart Street, London on January 1, 1635[15] and was probably born in London sometime late in 1634.

Ward of Uncle Richard Waring; Possible Servant to John Winthrop, Jr.

After their father's death in 1638 and mother's death in November 1644, [16] Richard Waring (then about 10) and his sister Katharine Waring (then about 16) became wards of their uncle Richard Waring.[17]

Uncle Richard Waring and John Winthrop, Jr. (the son of the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and later, himself, the governor of the Connecticut Colony) had become acquainted when uncle Richard purchased Groton Manor from the Winthrops in 1631.[18] John Jr. apparently heard that uncle Richard Waring had been saddled with taking care of two of his brother's children and had his cousin Emmanuel Downing approach uncle Richard Waring with a proposal for John Jr. to take charge of the two children in consideration for uncle Richard Waring releasing a debt that John Jr. owed to him. In a letter dated February 1645, Emmanuel reported back to John Jr.:

I have spoke with Mr. Waring concerning the 2 Children and that he should release your debt towards your chardge about them. he seemed willing thereto, and said he would give order to mr. Peters [probably Waring's attorney] about yt who is now in the Countre.[17]

The footnote in the Winthrop Papers to this portion of the letter says that the two children that were referred to were "Katherine Warren and her brother Richard, wards of their uncle, Richard Waring."

Evidence suggests that it is probable that the proposal was agreed to, at least in part. The footnote referenced at the end of the prior paragraph goes on to say that Katherine served for a time in the household of John Winthrop, Jr.[17] As specific original evidence, the Winthrop Papers contain a letter dated 1649 from John Yongs to John Winthrop, Jr. that refers to Katherine Warren as formerly the servant to John Jr.[6]

It is quite possible that the full proposal was agreed to, and that uncle Richard Waring offloaded 10-year-old Richard Waring, as well as his big sister, to become a servant to John Winthrop Jr.

Emigration from England; First Presence in America

After being in England in 1641-1643, John Winthrop, Jr. had returned to Boston in 1644 to resume his role as an assistant of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.[19] Therefore, becoming a servant in John Jr's household meant coming to New England. Katharine Waring thus probably took a ship to Boston in the summer of 1645. In October 1645, John Winthrop, Jr. and his family left Boston and wintered on Fishers Island. In the summer of 1646, he moved his family to what would become New London, Connecticut.[20] As his household servant, Katharine Waring probably accompanied the family in their moves. The Yongs letter mentioned above refers to Katharine as having taking a trip to Long Island (presumably from New London) and provides positive proof that she was living in the area in 1649.[6]

Richard Waring may well have joined his sister in coming to Boston in 1645 and moving to New London in 1646. No record has been found, however, that positively confirms that. No record has been found, in fact, that positively establishes Richard's presence in America until at least 10 years later. This is not particularly surprising, however, as Richard would not have been expected to be found in transactional records until he became 21, which was probably not until late 1655.

"A Short History of the Warings" and a number of other older genealogy books say that Richard arrived in America on the "Endeavor" in 1664.[1][21][22] That is certainly incorrect, as records show that Richard was clearly in America years before then. "An American Family Called Warren," says that Richard emigrated from England aboard the “Endeavor,” probably arriving in Boston in 1654.[2] While that date is more plausible, no original records have been found that indicate that Richard arrived in Boston around that date. Moreover, no original records have been found that a ship named the "Endeavor" brought immigrants to America during 1645-1660.

The earliest purported record of Richard in America is a list in Thompson's "History of Long Island" that claims to be a listing of the inhabitants of Brookhaven two years after its founding in 1655 (ie, 1657) and includes the name of Richard Waring.[8] However, the original source for this list has not been found and there is reason to believe that the dating may be somewhat off.

There are in fact, more reliable records showing that Richard Waring was living in New London, Connecticut until at least 1660. First, a New London record shows that Richard Waring, in partnership with a William Chapell, bought a house-lot in New London in 1659.[9] Second, several letters by John Tinker to John Winthrop, Jr. in 1660 that are contained in the Winthrop Papers refer to Richard Waring (or Wareing) and indicate that he was probably still living in New London at the date of the letters.[23][24]

Residency in Setauket/Brookhaven

Richard's sister Katharine and her second husband, Daniel Lane, moved from Southold, Long Island to Setauket (later known as Brookhaven), Long Island prior to 1662. Probably not by coincidence, Richard Waring moved from New London to Setauket about the same time. The earliest reliable record for both Daniel Lane and Richard Waring in Setauket is a January 1662 listing of the houses and land purchased by Daniel Lane in Setauket/Brookhaven that refers to Richard Waring having 3 acres in the old field that he exchange with Daniel Lane for 5 acres in the little neck.[25]

Setauket/Brookhaven records show that Richard lived in Setauket/Brookhaven from 1662 until 1684. While living there, Richard was chosen as one of the town overseers in 1673, 1677 and 1683.[26]

Disproven - The "Two Richards" Theory

"An American Family Called Warren" seems to propose that (i) Richard Waring immigrated with a young son, also named Richard, (ii) the elder Richard died around 1670, and (iii) all events relating to Richard Waring after about 1670 relate to the younger Richard Waring. No evidence was cited for this theory. However, it was probably based on several evidentiary fragments, which, upon further examination, provide little or no support for the theory. First, Thompson's "History of Long Island" has the name Richard Waring twice in the list of inhabitants of Brookhaven in 1657.[8] While it might be thought that one was the father and one was the son, (i) under the "Two Richards" theory, the son would only have been about 10 at the time so that it highly unlikely that he would be included in the list, and (ii) it is unlikely that someone would include two people with the same name in a short list without adding some descriptor to differentiate them. Most likely, the inclusion of Richard Waring's name in the list twice was just an error. Second, "A Short History of the Warings" and several other older genealogies mention that Richard immigrated with a young son, also named Richard. Again, no evidence for these assertions is provided. Moreover, none of these genealogies suggest that the younger Richard was the father of John, Edmund or Michael Waring. Third, if Richard Waring was the son of Christopher Warren, he would have been baptized in 1619, making him quite old to have been having children up to 1683 and active in land transactions up to 1698. In order to make the Christopher Warren parentage more plausible, it is therefore convenient to adopt a theory that Richard arrived with a young son who was the Richard Waring who appears in the records from 1670-1698. Once the Christopher Warren parentage is eliminated, however, Richard's date of birth is no longer pegged to 1619 and the need for a second, younger Richard to father children in 1670-1683 and engage in land transactions up to 1698 disappears.

There is, in fact, compelling evidence against the "Two Richards" theory and in favor of the proposition that Richard Waring arrived in America alone (without a son named Richard), fathered the children born in 1670-1683 and engaged in the land transactions up to 1698. First, the respected Donald Lines Jacobus assumed all the Brookhaven Oyster Bay records related to a single Richard Waring who was the brother of Katherine (Waring) Lane.[5] Second, the original records of Brookhaven present a continuous series of records referring to Richard Waring from 1662 through 1684 without anything that even hints that there might have been an elder and a younger Richard Waring.[27] Third, once it is established that Richard Waring was the son of Michael Waring and born probably in late 1634, it becomes highly unlikely that Richard would have had a son who could have gotten married to an Akerly around 1667.

There are some aspects of the "Two Richards" theory that may be true, however. First, it may well be true that the Richard who shows up in the Brookhaven and Oyster Bay records came over as a young boy. If Richard came over to America at the same time his sister Katherine did (probably in 1645), he would only have been 10 years old when he arrived. Second, it is possible that Richard's uncle accompanied him, in which case it would indeed be true that a Richard Waring (the uncle) arrived with a young boy also named Richard Waring. (There is no evidence of this, however, and it is clear that, if uncle Richard did accompany him, he did not stay.) Perhaps more likely is that the records of the ship indicated that the young passenger Richard Waring belonged to a Richard Waring, which may have led some to believe they both immigrated and were father and son.

Religion

Both "A Short History of the Warings" and "An American Family Called Warren" state that Richard was originally a Presbyterian.[1][2] Thompson's "History of Long Island" states that Brookhaven was originally settled by Presbyterians,[8] but there is no evidence that Richard Waring himself was one. "An American Family Called Warren" further claims that Richard became a Quaker.[2] No record has been found that directly supports Richard being a Quaker, but circumstantial evidence makes it plausible. First, Brookhaven is known to have been the location of one of the original Quaker communities and like, Richard, many of the Brookhaven Quakers later moved to Oyster Bay.[28] Second, Richard's son John and most of his children later moved to the Philadelphia area where at least some of them joined the Essex meeting of the Society of Friends.[29]

Marriage

Richard married a daughter of Robert Akerly, another resident of Brookhaven. This is established by a 1675 Brookhaven record in which Robert Akerly sells a lot to Richard Waring his son-in-law[30] and supported by several secondary sources.[2][31][32]

Date of Marriage

"An American Family Called Warren" says the date of Richard's marriage was 1671,[2] but no support is provided, and it is likely that it was estimated based on an estimated date of birth for their first child, John, which that book put as 1672. However, several records from Brookhaven and Queens Village suggest that John was more likely born about 1668.[33] As a result, a more probable date for Richard's marriage to Robert Akerly's daughter is about 1667.

First Name of Spouse

A number of sources and most family trees give the first name of Robert's spouse as Lydia.[31][32] Both Jacobus and William Wallace Warren, however, suggest that this may be a mistake originally based on a misunderstanding of an April 9, 1707 deed in which a Richard Waring and his wife Lydia conveyed property to John Waring. As Jacobus and William Wallace Warren point out, and as the index to the Oyster Bay record book itself indicates,[34] the Richard Waring in that deed was probably Richard Waring Jr. (this profile's son). (According to "An American Family Called Warren," Richard Waring Jr's. wife's name was Lydia Bostwick.[2]) As a result, neither Jacobus nor William Wallace Warren were convinced that first name of the Akerly woman that this profile's Richard Waring married was named Lydia.

In fact, a 1688 Brookhaven record (not mentioned by either Jacobus or William Wallace Warren, who do not seem to have had access to Book B of the Brookhaven records which cover the period from 1679-1756), shows a conveyance by Richard Waring and his wife Mary of property in Brookhaven to a man named Arthur Futhy.[35] It is therefore most probable that the name of the daughter of Robert Akerly whom Richard married was Mary and not Lydia.

Children

Richard and Mary (Lydia) had the following children:

  1. John, b. 1668, m. about 1695 Elizabeth White, d. July 4, 1733 in Amity Township, Pennsylvania
  2. Richard, b. 1673,[2] m. about 1694 Lydia Bostwich[2]
  3. Edmund, b. about 1674,[5] m. October 6, 1698 Elizabeth Bouton in Norwalk, Connecticut,[5] d. August 5, 1749 in Norwalk, Connecticut[2]
  4. Michael, b. 1683,[2] m. about 1715 Rebecca Scudder in Stamford, Connecticut,[5] d. February 16, 1726 in Stamford, Connecticut[2]

Residency in Queen's Village and Oyster Bay

In 1685, Richard moved to the Manor of Queens Village on Horse Neck (later called Lloyd's Neck), where he rented a 100-acre farm from James Lloyd.[36][37] From the Lloyd family records, it appears that Richard was one of the two first settlers on Horse Neck.

Richard seems to have continued living in Queens Village until 1689 when he bought property in nearby Oyster Bay, Long Island (now part of Huntington).[38][2] The Oyster Bay records are inconsistent in describing the area of Oyster Bay to which Richard moved as either Springfield or Cold Spring. Springfield was the name at the time for the inland area that is now Jericho, Long Island, while Cold Spring was perhaps a description of a more general area around Cold Spring river, which could have included Springfield.[39] Based on his continued appearance in Oyster Bay records,[40] Richard appears to have continued to live in Oyster Bay until his death.

Death

There is no record of Richard Waring's death. Consistent with old age, the Oyster Bay records show a lack of transactional activity by Richard after he moved there, until in 1695-1697, perhaps expecting that he would not live much longer, there were a number of transactions in which Richard transferred parcels of his property to his sons.[41] "An American Family Called Warren" estimated his date of death as 1697/8 based there not being any records of him after that date.[2] However, there is a June 30, 1698 record show a Richard Waren as a witness to a deed, which the Oyster Bay records index attributes to Richard Waring Sr. It is therefore perhaps more likely that Richard died sometime after that date, say, 1699.[42]

Records Relating to Richard Waring

New London Records

The following records relating to Richard Waring's period of residence in New London are from Caulkins' "History of New London" and the Winthrop Papers.

  • 1659. Richard Waring, in partnership with a William Chapell, bought a house-lot on New Street in New London.[9]
  • February 4, 1660. Letter from John Tinker in New London to John Winthrop, Jr. in Hartford stating that he had sent Richard Waring to the Island (presumably Fishers Island) to bring back a boat and suggested that they may need to use him to tend to the farm animals on the Island.[23]
  • February 17, 1660. Letter from John Tinker in New London to John Winthrop, Jr. in Hartford stating that Richard Waring has proffered his services for the Island.[24]

Brookhaven Records

Although Brookhaven was first settled in 1655[8][43] the Brookhaven town record books only contain records from 1662 and later.[44] Richard Waring shows up from the start. As noted above, it seems that neither Jacobus nor William Wallace Warren had access to Book B of the Brookhaven records, which cover the period from 1679-1756. Therefore the records listed below for that period represent important additions to our knowledge of Richard, including that he continued to live in Brookhaven until at least late 1684 and that the first name of his wife was Mary.

Brookhaven records contain the following entries relating to Richard Waring:

  • January 29, 1662. A listing of the houses and land purchased by Daniel Lane refers to Richard Waring having 3 acres in the old field that he exchange with Daniel Lane for 5 acres in the little neck[25]
  • April 2, 1663. A listing of the real property of Richard Waring describes 4 separate parcels of land.[45]
  • December 8, 1663. Richard Waring listed as a juror.[46]
  • January 23, 1664. Richard Waring among inhabitants of Setauket authorizing representatives to settle land disputes.[47]
  • October 10, 1664. Richard Waring among townspeople agreeing to pay Daniel Lane for building a mill.[48]
  • December 25, 1665. Richard Waring to pay 1 share for Mr Scotts fensing.[49]
  • October 18, 1666. Richard Waring buys a 4 year old cover in exchange for a 3 acre lot.[50]
  • November 16, 1666. Joshua Garlick bought all accommodations of Richard Waring given him by the town except for a 3 acre lott.[51]
  • February 24, 1667/8. Joshua Garlick agrees with Richard Waring to fence so land.[52]
  • 1668. Richard Waring giving 1 lott in first town allotments.[53]
  • June 1, 1668. Richard Warings bought the home lott of Joshua Garlick.[54]
  • May 22, 1668. Richard Waring of Brookhaven exchanged two cows for a mare of John Underhills of Oyster Bay.[47]
  • October 27, 1668. Town meeting grants Richard Waring the home lott that was Avery the smith's.[55]
  • July 10, 1669. Richard Waring among residents agreeing to contribute to encourage a smith to settle in town.[56]
  • September 8, 1669. Richard Waring sells a 10 acre lott to William Salliar for 5 pounds, 6 shillings in wheat[57]
  • August 22, 1671. Richard Waring, with two others and an "Ingen" [Indian], was appointed to lay out the east line of our [the town's] bounds.[58]
  • June 10, 1672. Richard Waring and Samuel Akerly engaged as cow keepers by by the inhabitants of high street[59]
  • April 1673. John Geners [Jenners] and Richard Waring chosen as Overseers[60]
  • 1675. Richard Waring drew a lot in the new purchase at the south.[61]
  • April 1675. William Salyer hired by Richard Waring to fence in a 10 acre lot.[62]
  • August 17, 1675. Robert Akerly agrees to sell to Richard Waring his son-in-law a 6 acre lot; Richard Waring signing his name, Robert Akerly marking with an X.[30][This record establishes that Richard's wife was a daughter of Robert Akerly/Ackerly.]
  • June 8, 1676. Richard Waring exchanges one of his geldings for one of the geldings of gordg woulcuts (George Wolcott?).[63]
  • December 26, 1676. Richard Waring exchanges a share of a meadow for a meadow of Mr. Thomson.[64]
  • January 12, 1676/7. Richard Waring sold two steers to Mr. Richard Mann for 12 yards of cloth.[65]
  • April 2, 1677. Richard Waring chosen one of the four Overseers of the Town.[66]
  • May, 1677. Inhabitants drew lots by the west line and Richard Waring drew 6th and got 10 acres.[67]
  • June 22, 1678. Richard Waring signs a land conveyance as a witness.[68]
  • August 26, 1678. Samuel Akerly exchanged a meadow with Richard Waring [Samuel was son of Robert Akerly, hence Waring’s brother-in-law.][69]
  • August 27, 1678. Richard Waring sold a meadow to Robert Cellen in return for an ox and a heifer.[70]
  • January 31, 1679. Richard Waring bought two steers from Robert Gouldbery in exchange for a piece of meadow, a black cow and a yearling cow.[71]
  • July 2, 1679. Richard Waring exchanged a 5-acre lot in new town for 4 acres in Crane's Neck owned by Petter Whietheare.[72]
  • October 21, 1679. Richard Waring acknowledges owing a debt of 8 pounds 10 shillings to Benonie Flint of Southampton.[73]
  • November 1, 1679. Richard Waring sold 15 acres of meadow to William Williams.[74]
  • June 19, 1680. Richard Waring sells a 4-acre lot in new town to Ralf Daiton for 2 barrells of oil.[75]
  • March 12, 1681. Richard Waring sells 40 acres to Joseph Lee for a barrell of oil, 7 shillins in bone, 20 yards of good duffels and 4 yards of karsy.[76]
  • November 11, 1681. Richard Waring sold a 6-acre lot in the old field with Liet. RIchard Floyd in exchange for a 5-acre lot in Crane's Neck and 40 shillings.[77]
  • June 29, 1682. Richard Waring sold an acre of land in Crane's Neck to Sakery Hawkens.[78]
  • February 9, 1683. Thomas Ward sold a 9-acre lot in new town to Richard Waring in exchange for a 10-acre lot in the southwest division.[79]
  • April 2, 1683. William Satterly chosen as constable and Jacob Longbothem and Richard Waring chosen as overseers.[80]
  • October 3, 1683. Mrs. Katteren More (formerly Mrs. Lane) sold a 5-acre lot in Little Neck to Richard Waring.[81]
  • December 1, 1683. Richard Waring witnessed a sale by John Jenners of some land.[82]
  • October 30, 1684. At a town meeting, Richard Waring, Thomas Smith, and Petter Whietehere were appointed try to obtain land on which to put a townhouse for a minister.[83]
  • 1684/5. Richard Waring among the persons drawing lots laid out in the south.[84]
  • December 27, 1688. Richard Waring and Mary his wife, of Queens Village in Queen County, sell at least 44 acres of land (and buildings thereon) in Brookhaven to Arthur Futhy. Witnessed by 3, including John Waring [presumably Richard's 16-year-old son].[35] [This record establishes that the first name of Richard's wife (at least at the time) was Mary.]

Queens Village Records

Since the Manor of Queens Village on Horse Neck was owned by the Lloyd family, the records relating to the Village are found in the Lloyd family papers. They contain the following entries relating to Richard Waring:

  • March 2, 1685. Agreement between John Grey and Richard Waring of Brookhaven and Isaac Arnold, attorney for James Lloyd, for lease, settlement and improvement of 100 acres of upland and meadow on House Neck.[36]
  • April 2, 1685. Richard Waring's lease pursuant to the March 2, 1685 agreement.[37]
  • 1686. James Lloyd's books of account for that year show 2 pounds 18 shillings "allowed Warring and Grey for their paines"[85] and 5 pounds "allowed Warring and Grey first setlers gratuity"[86]
  • 1689. James Lloyd's books of account for that year show a credit of 6 pounds 10 shillings "By increas of catle delivered R. Warring."[87]
  • February 21, 1689. James Lloyd's account with tenant John Warring shows livestock, building materials and sundries sold to him on account, with a final balance of over 87 pounds, half of which was never paid.[88]

Oyster Bay Records

Oyster Bay records contain the following entries relating to Richard Waring:

  • September 26, 1689. Daniel Whitehead (wife Abigail signs with him) deeds to Richard Waring of Horse Neck 30 acres at Cold Spring in Oyster Bay.[38][2]
  • October 7, 1689. Richard Waring livestock mark is recorded as "a Latch on ye upper side of ye right eare & a hapeny in ye underside of ye same."[89]
  • January 25, 1695/6 Richard Waren of Springfield in Oyster Bay deeds for love of his son, John Waren of Horse Neck alias Queen's Village, one third of the accommodations at Springfield which I bought of Capt. Daniel Whitehead.[90][2]
  • January 2, 1696/7. Richard Waren, Sr. at Cold Spring in Oyster Bay deeds to his son Richard Waren, Jr. land joining Edmund Waren's land.[91][2]
  • March 2, 1696/7. Richard Waren, Sr. of Could Spring in Oyster Bay, Yeoman conveys to son Edmond Waren two pieces joining to Huntington line at Could Sring: not to be sold by Edmand Waren before a tender is made to said Edmand's brothers.[92][2]
  • June 30, 1698. Richard Waren witnessed a deed of land by William Frost.[42]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Waring, Robert Newton. "A Short history of the Warings." 1898. p. 13
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 Warren, William Wallace. "An American Family Called Warren." W.W. Warren, 1991 (available on familysearch.org). p 10-16 & Chart I
  3. 3.0 3.1 Richard Waring Family Information Sheet
  4. See information for Richard Warren in profile for his father, Christopher Warren.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Jacobus, Donald Lines. "Notes on the Richard Waring Family." The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Vol. 102, Number 1. 1971. pp. 1-6.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 "Winthrop Papers, Volume V, 1645-1649," The Massachusetts Historical Society, 1947, p 362
  7. 7.0 7.1 Marriage date based on fact that they were already married at the time of a May 1650 letter from Roger Williams to John Winthrop, Jr.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 Thompson, Benjamin Franklin. "History of Long Island: Containing an Account of the Discovery and Settlement; with Other Important and Interesting Matters to the Present Time." 1839. p 262.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Frances Manwaring Caulkins, "History of New London, Connecticut," H.D. Utley, New London, 1895, p 325
  10. See profile for Michael Waring.
  11. See profiles for Michael Waring and Richard Waring.
  12. 12.0 12.1 "Family: Michael WARING/Judith COWLEY," vandiverhistory.com
  13. 13.0 13.1 "The Thomas Doxsee the 3rd Long Island, NY Connection," doxsie.genealogyvillage.com
  14. 14.0 14.1 "Pedigree of Hervey Green (1806-1875) Scholars Version," mormonpioneergenealogylibrary.com
  15. 15.0 15.1 The Registers of St. Olave, Hart Street, London, 1563-1700, The Harleian Society, 1916, p 45
  16. See profile for their father, Michael Waring.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 "Winthrop Papers, Volume V, 1645-1649," The Massachusetts Historical Society, 1947, p 6, fn 2
  18. See profile for uncle Richard Waring.
  19. 19.0 19.1 "John Winthrop the Younger," wikipedia.org
  20. 20.0 20.1 D. Hamilton Hurd, "History of New London County, Connecticut," J.W. Lewis & Co., Philadelphia, 1882, p 138
  21. 21.0 21.1 Cutter, William Richard. "Genealogical and Family History of Western New York: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Building of a Nation. Volume 2." Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912. p 820
  22. 22.0 22.1 Reynolds, Cuyler. "Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs. Volume 1." Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911. p 354
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 "Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol ViII - Fourth Series," Boston, 1865, p 240
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 "Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol ViII - Fourth Series," Boston, 1865, p 243
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 69
  26. See "Brookhaven Records" in this profile."
  27. See "Brookhaven Records" in this profile."
  28. 28.0 28.1 Joyce Rosnel Weaver, "Far from Distant Lands: The 17th and 18th Century Quakers of Setauket, N.Y."
  29. See profile for Richard's son, John Waren.
  30. 30.0 30.1 30.2 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 19
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 Peter Ross, William Smith Pelletreau, "A History of Long Island: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 2," Lewis publishing Company, 1903, p 637
  32. 32.0 32.1 32.2 Seversmith, Herbert Furman. "Colonial families of Long Island, New York and Connecticut." 1939. p. 69
  33. See discussion in profile for John Waring.
  34. 34.0 34.1 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol III - 1704-1720. Wright, 1929. p. 738
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 285
  36. 36.0 36.1 36.2 Papers of the Lloyd family of the manor of Queens Village, Lloyd's Neck, Long Island, New York, 1654-1826. P. 65
  37. 37.0 37.1 37.2 Papers of the Lloyd family of the manor of Queens Village, Lloyd's Neck, Long Island, New York, 1654-1826. P. 70
  38. 38.0 38.1 38.2 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol II - 1691-1704. Wright, 1924. p. 68
  39. 39.0 39.1 Ross, Peter. "Oyster Bay." The History of Long Island, from its earliest settlement to the present time. Lewis Pub. Co., 1902.
  40. See "Oyster Bay Records" in this profile.
  41. See "Oyster Bay Records" in this profile.
  42. 42.0 42.1 42.2 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol II - 1691-1704. Wright, 1924. p. 310
  43. 43.0 43.1 Russell, Barbara M. "Brookhaven Town History." brookhaven.org
  44. 44.0 44.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924.
  45. 45.0 45.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 107
  46. 46.0 46.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 71
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 73
  48. 48.0 48.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 73
  49. 49.0 49.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 76
  50. 50.0 50.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 96
  51. 51.0 51.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 79
  52. 52.0 52.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 80
  53. 53.0 53.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 157
  54. 54.0 54.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 85
  55. 55.0 55.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 151
  56. 56.0 56.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 81
  57. 57.0 57.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II, p 133
  58. 58.0 58.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II. p. 135
  59. 59.0 59.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II. p. 91
  60. 60.0 60.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II. p. 86
  61. 61.0 61.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book II. p. 116
  62. 62.0 62.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 9
  63. 63.0 63.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 20
  64. 64.0 64.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book A. p. 50
  65. 65.0 65.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 40
  66. 66.0 66.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 20
  67. 67.0 67.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 37
  68. 68.0 68.1 Brookhaven town records. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 59
  69. 69.0 69.1 Brookhaven town records.. New York: T.A. Wright, 1924. Book I. p. 60
  70. 70.0 70.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book A. p. 57
  71. 71.0 71.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 502
  72. 72.0 72.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 12
  73. 73.0 73.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 19
  74. 74.0 74.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 339
  75. 75.0 75.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 44
  76. 76.0 76.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 67
  77. 77.0 77.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 94
  78. 78.0 78.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 127
  79. 79.0 79.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 187
  80. 80.0 80.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 142
  81. 81.0 81.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 170
  82. 82.0 82.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 178
  83. 83.0 83.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 204
  84. 84.0 84.1 Records of the town of Brookhaven. New York: Derrydale Press, 1930-1932. Book B. p. 4
  85. 85.0 85.1 Papers of the Lloyd family of the manor of Queens Village, Lloyd's Neck, Long Island, New York, 1654-1826. P. 95
  86. 86.0 86.1 Papers of the Lloyd family of the manor of Queens Village, Lloyd's Neck, Long Island, New York, 1654-1826. P. 96
  87. 87.0 87.1 Papers of the Lloyd family of the manor of Queens Village, Lloyd's Neck, Long Island, New York, 1654-1826. P. 99
  88. 88.0 88.1 Papers of the Lloyd family of the manor of Queens Village, Lloyd's Neck, Long Island, New York, 1654-1826. P. 102-104
  89. 89.0 89.1 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol II - 1691-1704. Wright, 1924. p. 349
  90. 90.0 90.1 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol II - 1691-1704. Wright, 1924. p. 244
  91. 91.0 91.1 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol II - 1691-1704. Wright, 1924. p. 67
  92. 92.0 92.1 Oyster Bay Town Records, Vol III - 1704-1720. Wright, 1929. p. 22


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On 16 Aug 2017 at 21:30 GMT Elizabeth Warren wrote:

So impressed with the documentation. Thank you for sharing all your hard work!!

On 16 Oct 2016 at 19:02 GMT Sheila Stahl wrote:

Some one did an amazing job researching this man. Thank you.

On 6 Nov 2015 at 22:45 GMT Jillaine Smith wrote:

FYI, I've downloaded the 15-page 1971 article by Jacobus about Richard of Brookhaven and his descendants.

On 27 Mar 2015 at 23:43 GMT Tish Bucher wrote:

From Ancestry Search--England Records

Name: Richard Warren Gender: Male Christening Date: 15 Aug 1619 Christening Place: Sydenham Damerel, Devonshire, England Father's name: Christopher Warren

Note: Elizabeth Ivatt/Jouatt, etc., was 15 years old when she married first husband Francis Marsh in 1629. The marriage license(?) is on Ancestry also.

On 10 Dec 2014 at 23:27 GMT Bob Tonsmeire wrote:

Waring-286 and Waring-287 appear to represent the same person because: Same name, similar fathers



Richard is 24 degrees from Rosa Parks, 22 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 16 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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