James  Warren Sr.

James Warren Sr. (abt. 1620 - bef. 1702)

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James Warren Sr.
Born about in Berwick, Scotlandmap [uncertain]
Son of and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died before in Berwick, York, Mainemap
Warren-835 created 27 Jan 2011 | Last modified
This page has been accessed 204 times.

Categories: Unlinked Profiles | Maine | Maine, Warren Name Study | Kittery, Maine.


This person was created through the import of MASTER2011WIKITREE.GED on 27 January 2011. The following data was included in the gedcom. You may wish to edit it for readability.

Contents

Birth

Birth:
Date: ABT 1630?

Note

There is no evidence or source material posted for the marriage to Margaret Richards. There is also no evidence that Margaret Richards was the daughter of Thomas Richards as she does not appear in Anderson's The Great Migration Begins.

In addition, we lack evidence and source material to support the theory that his James Warren's father is James Cavalier.

Biography

James Warren was born in England or Scotland and tradition says he was among the prisoners that Oliver Cromwell sent to New England after his victory over the royal troops at Dunbar in the north.

"Having defeated the Royalists in England and beheaded the king in 1649, Cromwell proceeded to the conquest of Ireland where his fanatical "Croppies" spent the following summer in turning that country into a bloody shambles. Defended or defenseless towns were laid low and his butcheries spared neither the armed nor unarmed. The fanatical Puritan, feeling that he had wiped out the hated Catholics for a generation at least, was aroused by a new challenge in his ruthless progress. The Scottish Parliament had proclaimed the youthful Prince Charles, then a fugitive at the Hague, as their king. The Proclamation was provisional, however, requiring him to subscribe to to their Covenant and accept Parliamentary direction in civil affairs and to the Presbyterian Assembly in ecclesiastical matters. Embarrassing as these terms were, he decided to comply with them, and this situation created a new menace to the Commonwealth and to Cromwell. With his veterans from Ireland as a nucleus, the insatiable "Noll" gathered an army of about 16,000 of which a third were mounted troops. With these he invaded the last kingdom remaining loyal to the Crown and, reaching Edinburgh after some skirmishes he marched his army to Dunbar, a town on the east coast of Scotland just south of the Firth of Forth. By this time his new levies were rapidly decreasing in numbers through disease and fatigue of the forced marches. Supplies could only reach him by sea at Dunbar as General David Leslie in command of the Scottish troops had seized the passes which furnished the only retreat from Scotland to Durham and Berwick-on-Tweed. Leslie's troops outnumbered Cromwell's army, but they were undisciplined clansmen unused to war in its technical aspects and the Scottish general declined to give open battle hoping to starve out Cromwell then hemmed in on the narrow peninsula of Dunbar. Meanwhile the young King Charles had arrived from Holland and joined this motley military organization to the great joy of the clansmen and made himself popular by sharing their rough camp life and engaging in some of the daily skirmishes at the outposts. These "braw laddies" showed their preference for his leadership over the capped and gowned committee of argumentative Covenanters who were busy purging the force of unbelievers until they had eliminated all or most of its skillful soldiers. Then, satisfied that they had an army of approved saints, they demanded that the king retire from the front and leave the direction of the campaign to them. Wishing to take an advantage of a favorable opportunity, Leslie proposed to attack Cromwell on Sunday, but the fanatical dominies would not permit him to break the Sabbath even for this desirable purpose. Night and day these theological crusaders wrestled with the Lord in prayer and finally had assurance in a "revelation" that the Lord of Hosts would deliver Agag (Cromwell) into their hands. They ordered Leslie to attack. Descending from the heights of Lammermoor which overlooked Cromwell's camp they reached the plains of Dunbar. Cromwell, observing this movement did not need any "revelation" to tell him that the Lord of Hosts was about to deliver them into his hands. He had been waiting for that hour as his only salvation. He gave orders for an immediate attack in force and though greatly inferior in numbers his disciplined troops soon showed their superiority over the untrained but brave clansmen. Leslie's army was routed and Cromwell's cavalry pursued the disorganized Covenanters with great slaughter. The chief if not the only resistance to his onslaught was made by a regiment of Highlanders who fought with great desperation as they had learned from his conquest of Ireland the tales that Cromwell would put all men to the sword and thrust hot irons through women's breasts. Three thousand Scots fell in this disaster fighting hopelessly to the last, 10,000 were taken prisoner. About half of the latter were so exhausted and disabled by wounds that Cromwell immediately released them. He wrote that he had lost only twenty men in this battle and he had every reason to believe that the Lord had given him the victory.

Of the 5,000 able-bodied prisoners that marched down to Durham cathedral only 3,500 survived the march and raw cabbage which killed with the "flux". The cathedral had been converted into a prison where these unfortunate Highlanders were destined to spend an indefinate period as captives of war. Their disposition was a problem both from a sanitary and political standpoint.

An opportunity was presented to the officials of the commonwealth in London. Laborers were greatly needed in the new American colonies and on 19 Sept. 1650, sixteen days after the battle, there was an order in council passed to deliver 900 prisoners for transportation to Virginia and 150 for New England. James was one of 150 survivors selected as "well and sound and free of wound" on behalf of John Becx & Co. of the Saugus Iron Works to be delivered to Augustine Walker of Charlestown master of the "Unity" which sailed 11 Nov. 1650. Sixty of the prisoners were destined for the iron works in Saugus and the remainder were distributed throughout numerous towns in Massachusetts and New Hampshire in a kind of modified slavery or compulsory service which was to terminate in seven years. John Cotton had his qualms about this camouflaged slavery. In a letter to Cromwell dated Boston 28 July 1651 he said: "The Scots whom God delivered into your hands at Dunbarre and whereof sundry were sent hither, we have been desirous (as we could) to make their yoke easy. Such as were sick of the scurvey or other diseases have not wanted Physick and chyrugery. They have not been sold for slaves to perpetual servitude. But for 6 or 7 or 8 yeares as we do our own." While their plight here was pitiful it was not so disastrous as befell those who were left behind in Durham half of whom died within a few months of contagious deseases. In this country they were looked upon as aliens and their Gaelic accent was scarcely understandable."(17)

In 1651 Richard Leader, recently resigned from managing the Saugus Iron Works, began with his brother George the management of the mills on the Great Works River for John Becx & Co. Leader brought with him his bond prisoners which were bought for £20 to £30 each. Five years later Leader sold out his interests and freed his servants many of whom were granted land in Kittery. In Newichawannock between Thompson's Brook (Shorey's) and the Great Works River James was granted land 15 Aug. 1656. He received 50 acres with 48 poles (660') fronting Cow Cove where the "Pied Cow" dropped anchor in 1634, now part of the South Berwick Vaughn Woods Memorial.

Before 1656, James had settled in the upper part of Kittery, Maine which is now the town of South Berwick.

"I John Daves of York have Sold to James Warren, forty Acres of Upland lying betwixt ye sd Daves Marsh & the bridge, And ye sd Warren is to have halfe ye breadth of ye fourscore Acres which ye town of York gave to the Said Daves & William More & John Harker, that is to Say halfe ye breadth by the water Side... 6. of 8. Month 1662...
John Daves
the mark of Mary MD Daves
Witness...
ffrancis Johnson
Timothy Yeales
John Penwill
Benjamin Whitney".(7)

James probably never occupied this land, however, he may have cultivated it and harvested whatever crops he planted. James retained this property for 40 years until it was bequeathed to his son Gilbert.

James was the Commissioner for Kittery 5 July 1664.(18) He was on the grand jury 28 Dec. 1665(3) and also 12 June 1666.(4) He was again on jury duty 19 Aug. 1668.(5) In 1670 Margaret and other Scots were admonished for using profane language and in 1674 James was bound to good behavior and was disiplined for abetting Richard Gibson.(6)

In his will dated 9 Feb. 1683/4, Alexander Cooper made arrangements for his only son, John: "It is my will & desire to Commit under god, both my sonn, & my estate left him untill hee come to age, unto my Loveing freinds vidzt Richard Nason Senjor, James Warrine Senior, & Peter Grant whome I leave as feofees in trust, faithfully to take Care both of my sonn & Estate, & for the Improvement & security there of, for my sonns best advantage..." (14)

He signed a Kittery petition as a selectman 13 Apr. 1697.(8) He signed a Berwick petition again as a selectman 4 Sept. 1697(9) and another 20 May 1698 requesting £20 for the maintenance of the ministry: "whereas the circumstance of the parish of Barwick continues as bad as, or rather more grievous than hitherto by reason of the not ceasing of the wars & the extreme deadness in trading." They were granted £15 for the maintenance of the ministry for the year beginning Sept. 1698 on 2 Dec. 1698.(10) James then signed a Berwick petition for a township as a Berwick selectman 26 July 1700.(11)


James Warren had several grants of land and held various town offices. His will was dated 9 December 1700 and proved 24 December 1702. His wife Margaret was born in Ireland and her will was dated 13 December 1712 and proved 15 October 1713. They had five children: Gilbert, James, Margaret, Grisel, and Jane. [1]

"James Warren Senr of Barwick in Kittery... In consideration of ye Naturall affection that he beareth toward his son Gilbert Warren... Hath given.... unto his sd son Gilbert... a certain parcel of Land containing forty Acres Scituate in York near the Bridge comonly called York Bridge on ye Eastward side of that branch of York River... ye sd Gilbert... to pay yearly as long as his father or mother shall live ye Sum of thirty Shilling... And in case sd Gilbert or his heires During sd James his life or his present wifes, shall refuse to make sd paymt Sd James shall have power to reenter on thirty Acres of ye Premisses Lying together most unimproved And have as good a title as before... this twenty fifth day of March in ye year... One thousand Seven hundred and one... James X Warren, Gilbert X Warren... in ye presents of us James X Stackpole, John Wade".(16)

"In the name of god Amen: James warren Sinr of the parish of Barwick in the town of Kittrey... Do make & ordain this my last will & testement as foloweth being sick & week of bodey but in good & perfect memory Viz...

1- I do give unto my son Gilbirt warren all yt tract of land which I bought of John Davis liingy in ye town ship of York to him & to his haires forever
2- I do give unto my son James warren all my other Lands marshes medoes buldings of all sorts Liing in ye town shep of Kettrey or elce whare to him & his haires for ever
3- I do Give to my Daughter Margrat Stagpole five Shiling
4- I do Give to by Daughter Grizel five Shilings-
5- I do Give to my Grandaughter Jane Grant five Shilings
6- I do Give to my Grandson James Stacpole- one hefer & one Ewe & a young fold-
7- I do Give unto Margrat waren my loveing wife all ye rest of my of my Estate it being moveabels for her Comfertabel mantainance and no legusi before mentioned to be demanded til her decse
8- I do Constitute & Appoint My liveing wife Margrat & my son James waren to bee Executrix and Executor to this my will & testement made this ninth day of December one thousand seven hundred as wittness my hand-
James X Waren
his mark-
witnesses
Robert: X : Gray
his mark
James: A : Stacpole
his mark
Nicolas Gowen

An Invatary of the Estate of James Warren Late of Kittrey deceased
Imp: to his waring Cloathes........................... 03-00-00
to two Cows & two Hiffers of three years.... 12-00-00
to fourteen Sheep.......................................... 04-04-00
to Six Swine and Six piggs............................. 05-08-00
to the Dwelling house and the barn:
and ye home Lot of Land............................... 80-00-00
to hundred Acres of Land and ten Acres of Marsh
Lying at whits Marsh...................................... 40-00-00
to two barrels & one hogshead.......................... ( )
to one half bushel.......................................... 00-01-00
to two Brast Chaines and Apees and
one Cleaver……............................................…. 00-16-00
to tooles and old Iron..................................... 01-07-00
to Brass But Saw............................................. 00-07-00
to one barrel Sider......................................... 00-10-00
to Indian Corn................................................. 02-05-00
to A grind Stone.............................................. 00-05-00
( ) from Richard ( )........................................... 05-10-00
to two ( ) and two pichfork tynes................. 00-03-00
to Linning yarn and wooling Cotton wool
and Sheep wool:............................................ 04-10-00
to beding: and one feather bed bolster
and pillows……............................................…. 08-00-00
to four sheets:................................................. 03-00-00
to new Cloath: Linning and woling............... 02-10-00
to one brass Kittel.......................................... 02-00-00
to Hachet......................................................... 00-01-08
to forty Acres of Land by york bridg............. 30-00-00
to puter:........................................................... 01-06-00
to Spoones: woodin Trayes A ( )......................... 03-00
to one Iron Kittel one pott one fryen pan one skillet
one tramel A pare of pot Hoks..................... 01-01-00
to one Hamer one trowel pare of fire tongs: and som old
Iron and A pare of pincers............................ 00-06-00
to A Chamber pot and: eight pounds flax... 00-05-06
to four bushels pase:six bushels barley
and A Cooler….............................................…. 02-01-00
to A barel and: half of beef............................ 02-10-00
to A ( )............................................................... 00-08-00
to money:........................................................ 11-16-04
to one bushel mault: one bushel Sault........ 00-06-00
to two Chests.................................................. 00-04-00
Aprised December:ye:15:1702
Peter Grant
his O mark
William Goodin"(12)

In the will of James & Margaret's grandson, James Stackpole, dated 11 Nov. 1706 is the following:
"Item. I Give and bequeath unto my Honoured father James Stagpole... a piece of Broad Cloath of two yards, three quarters with the lineing and triming belonging thereunto left in the Custody of my Grandmother Magaret Warrin, and also Seaven yards & halfe of homespun drest wolen Cloth, and also all the Wages due to me from the Province as a Souldiar in her Majts Service.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my Uncle James Warrin, my young horse bridle and sadle..." (15)


In Vaughan Woods Memorial State park there is a plaque marking the home site of James and Margaret Warren. In the 1630's, much of this property was bought by Europeans and often given to indentured servants upon completion of their service. James Warren, a Scot loyal to the King of England during the civil war, was one of these indentured servants. At the end of his indentures, he settled on a 50 acre lot within the current park[2]

Sources

  1. Warren Orin. Warren; a genealogy of the descendants of James Warren who was in Kittery, Maine, 1652-1656; Haverhill, Mass., The Chase press, 1902. Archive.org
  2. Maine Trail Finder. Vaughan Memorial State Park Maine Trail Finder
  • (3) York Co. Court Records- Vol. III, p. 42
  • (4) Ibid- p. 54
  • (5) Ibid- Vol. IV, p.61
  • (6) Genealogical Dictionary of Maine & New Hampshire- p.721
  • (7) York Deeds- Vol. IV, fol.159
  • (8) Mass. Archives- Vol.3, pp.385-6
  • (9) Ibid- Vol.11, pp.125-125a
  • (10) Ibid- p.127a
  • (11) Ibid- Vol.3, p.394a
  • (12) York Co. Probate- I, 85
  • (13) Ibid- II, 66
  • (14) Maine Wills- p. 77, quoting York County Deeds- Vol. V, fol. 27
  • (15) Ibid- pp. 148-9, quoting York County Probate- Vol. I, fol. 130
  • (16) York Deeds- Vol. VI, fol. 97
  • (17) History of York, Maine- Banks, Vol. I, pp. 206-9
  • (18) York Co. Court Records- Vol. II, p. 205
  • Genealogy of the Descendants of James Warren- Orin Warren, Chase Press, Haverhill, Mass., 1902
  • History and Genealogy of the Stackpole Family- Everett S. Stackpole, Lewiston, 1920- pp.61-2
  • Adriel Warren of Berwick, ME: His Forebears and Descendants- Vanetta Hosford Warren, Boston, 1969
  • Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society- Vol. LXI, pp.16-29

See also:

  • Yates Publishing, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004), Ancestry.com, Source number: 755.001; Source type: Pedigree chart; Number of Pages: 5. Record for James Warren.
  • William Richard Cutter, William Frederick Adams. Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts, Volume 4. Lewis historical publishing Company, 1910 - Massachusetts, p 2637.
  • William Richard Cutter. Genealogical and Family History of Western New York: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Building of a Nation, Volume 1. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1912 - New York. p. 136


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James and Margaret Warren Plaque
James and Margaret Warren Plaque

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On 10 Feb 2016 at 18:52 GMT Elizabeth (Hart) Godwin wrote:

I posted disclaimers about spouse Margaret Richards and father of James Warren as there is no supporting evidence posted.



James is 14 degrees from Kevin Bacon, 15 degrees from Robynne Lozier, 12 degrees from Pocahontas Rolfe and 18 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II Windsor on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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