William Washburne
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William Washburne (bef. 1601 - 1658)

William "The Immigrant" Washburne aka Washburn
Born before in Bengeworth, Evesham, Worcestershire, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married about 1625 in Bengeworth, Evesham, Worcestershire, Englandmap [uncertain]
Descendants descendants
Died in Hempstead, Long Island, New Netherland Colony (later the Province of New York)map
Profile last modified | Created 6 Sep 2013
This page has been accessed 4,943 times.
The Puritan Great Migration.
William Washburne migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
Join: Puritan Great Migration Project
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William was an early settler (before 1664) of Hempstead, southwestern Nassau County, on Dutch-ruled western Long Island, as the town was founded by English colonists after purchase from natives in 1643, and then under a patent from New Netherland

Contents

Biography

William Washburne was a New Netherland settler.
He was the son of John Washburn and Martha Timbrell.[1]

He became heir in his father's will on 04 Aug. 1624 in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England. Strangely, William Wahbourne was NOT named in his mother's will dated 29 Sept 1625.

Christening

William Washburn, third son of John Washborne and Martha Timbrell, born in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, in 1601 Baptized on 9 Nov. 1601 in St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth.[1]

Migration

William Washburn, the immigrant ancestor to Connecticut Colony, and later Hempstead, Long Island, did not join his brother John Washburn in Plymouth Colony. He remained in England, where he raised a large family, and finally sailed with his in-laws to Connecticut,* eventually purchasing land and moving out to Long Island.

* His father-in-law being recorded in Stratford, CT on 10 Oct 1639, suggests that the family had arrived prior to this date.

The earliest record of William Washburn in Hempstead is in 1646 when “William Wasbandt” testified in court that he had sold a sow to a Mr. Stickley, the defendant, in a lawsuit brought by Tonis Nyssen, which was settled on 18 Oct. 1646 at Ft. Amsterdam in the New Amsterdam Colony.[2]

The statement below (citing the 1647 date) is in error*

He was first found in 1647* in Stratford, Connecticut, where he was one of the thirty five men who accepted the invitation of the first seventeen settlers to join them. Settled 1647* Stamford, CT.[citation needed]

* Stratford was founded in 1639 as "the plantation at Pequonnocke",[3] by Puritan leader Reverend Adam Blakeman, William Beardsley, and either 16 families—according to legend—or approximately 35 families—suggested by later research ... By April 13, 1643, the growing town was known as Stratford.[4]

In about 1645 William and Jane Washburn moved to Hempstead, Long Island, supposedly with “Rev. Mr. Leverich.”[5] The earliest record of William Washburn in Hempstead is in 1646 when “William Wasbandt” testified in court that he had sold a sow to a Mr. Stickley, the defendant, in a lawsuit brought by Tonis Nyssen, which was settled on 18 Oct. 1646 at Ft. Amsterdam in the New Amsterdam Colony.[6]

As one of the first purchasers in Hempstead, William Washburn was chosen as a deputy from Hempstead, along with John Seaman, Robert Coe, and John Hicks, to appeal to the British about the Dutch government from the Colony of New Netherlands, assuming jurisdiction over Long Island, and Washburn carried a remonstrance to the Dutch Governor, Peter Stuyvesant, in New Amsterdam, in 1653, regarding the English colonists’ concerns.[7]

In 1653 William Washburn and his son, John Washburn, both purchased land at Oyster Bay, Long Island, from the Indians, as joint purchasers along with Anthony Wright, Robert Williams, Thos. Armitage, Dan. Whitehead, Ric. Holbrooke, William Leverich, and Samuell Mayo. The deed was recorded 27 Mar. 1667 in New York.[8] Also in 1653 William Washburn was a witness to an Indian Deed in Oyster Bay, Long Island, in 1654 he was called “of Hempstead” in a New Haven Colony court record, and in 1654-1655 he was a member of the Assembly at Hempstead.[9]

William Washburn died testate in 1659 in Hempstead, Long Is­land. His will was dated 29 Sept. 1657, and was presented for probate by his widow, Jane Washborne, on 11 June 1659. He mentioned his sons Hope and John, daughters Patience, Hester, and Phebe, who were as yet unmarried, son-in-law Robert Williams’ children, son-in-law Edward Titus, Sara the daughter of Robert Jackson, and son-in-law Richard Willets. His wife had died sometime before him.

Marriage and Children

He married Jane Nichols about 1625, in Bengeworth or Sedgeberrow, Worcestershire, England[10] daughter of Francis Nichols and Frances Winarke [11] She was baptized on 14 Nov. 1603 in Sedgeberrow,[12] a granddaughter of John Nicholls, of Sedgeberrow.[13]

She has previously been identified as Jane Whitehead. The below is a post by John Maltby himself, on April 13, 2002, on GenForum:
In reply to: Wm. Washburn and wife Jane Whitehead
The wife of William WASHBURN was Jane NICHOLS, not WHITEHEAD. She was baptized on 3 Nov. 1603 in Sedgeberrow, Worcester Co., England, the daughter of Francis NICHOLS and his wife Frances WIMARKE, who were married at Sedgeberrow on 24 Jan. 1599/1600. See the excellent article about this family by Neil D. Thompson, CG, FASG, in "The American Genealogist", Oct. 2000, pp. 267-271, entitled "The English Origin of Sergeant Francis Nichols of Stratford, Connecticut."

William and Jane (NICHOLS) WASHBURN lived in Bengeworth, in the parish of Evesham, Worcester Co., England, which is only a couple of miles from Sedgeberrow. Unfortunately most of the baptismal records for the time period when their children were born have not survived. A few years of Bishop's Transcripts have survived, and from these meager records and the will of William WASHBURN in Hempstead, Long Island, we can piece together their children:

  1. Sarah WASHBURN, [14] Worcestershire, England, married Robert1 Williams,[15] of Oyster Bay and Hempstead, Long Island, in ca. 1645.[16].
  2. (Another daughter), [17] born about 1627 or 1628 in Bengeworth,[18] Worcestershire, England, married Robert Jackson, probably as his second wife, in ca. 1652,[19] presumably in Hempstead, Long Island. Miss Washburn, married to Robert Jackson is mentioned in court testimony regarding her father's Will. Robert Jackson "protested against the said will on behalf of his DECEASED wife and two female children, that are now living, had by the daughter of the aforesaid testator."
  3. Mary WASHBURN, born about 1628 or 1629 in Bengeworth,[20] Worcestershire, England, married Richard1 Willets, of Hempstead, in ca. 1649.[21]
  4. John WASHBURN, born about 1630 or 1631 in Bengeworth,[22] Worcestershire, married Mary Butler, daughter of Richard1 Butler, on 7 June 1655 in Stratford, CT.[23]
  5. Martha WASHBURN, born probably about 1632 or 1633, buried in Bengeworth on 14 Feb. 1636. probably born around 1633 or 1634 in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, buried on 14 Feb. 1636 in Bengeworth.[24]
  6. Hope WASHBURN, a son, born about 1634 or 1635 in Bengeworth,[25] Worcestershire, married Mary2 Stiles, daughter of Francis1 and Sarah Stiles, in ca. 1660 in Stratford, CT.[26]
  7. Martha WASHBURN, baptized on 18 Dec. 1637 in Bengeworth,[27] Worcestershire, married Edmund2 Titus, son of Robert1 and Hannah Titus, of Rehoboth, MA, and Huntington, Long Island,[28] in ca. 1657.[29]
  8. Phebe WASHBURN, supposedly born in 1641 in Stratford, CT, married John Ashman, of Long Island, in ca. 1661.[30]
  9. Patience WASHBURN, named in her father's 1657 will.
  10. Hester WASHBURN, named in her father's 1657 will, supposedly died in 1659 in Connecticut.

On 5 Dec. 1679 John Washburn, of “Corberry upon Long Island,” eldest son of William and Jane Washburn, gave a receipt to his uncle, Isaac Nicols, of Stratford, for £22 1s 8d “which was the whole amount sent over to me in the year sixteen hundred and seventy seven. I do acknowledge by these presents that I have received the sum and I do forever requit discharge exonerate my said uncle and all his executors administrators of the said sums or any demans upon that amount from me or my heirs executors or assigns…”[31] proving that there was some kinship between the family of Isaac Nichols and John Washburn.

Will

The will of William Washburn of Hempstead (1657): [1] *
I William Washborne doe appoint my well beloved friends and faithfull to be my Overseeres of this my Will and testament I give to my Sonn Hope my six oxen and fower cowes and one horse one mare, and all my Land and devisens with the meadowes belonging thereto, and Barne and home-lott with all instruments of husbandry except one third part of a meadow that my Son John please to have, then he shall paying costs for ye same: Allsoe I give him two sowes, allsoe I give to my daughter Patience three cowes or steeres alsoe I give to my daughter Hester three cowes or steeres and one mare between them bothe. Allsoe I give to my daughter Phebe three kowes or three steeres, these to be paid at their day of marriage yf they carry to the likeing of these my overseeres (yet not to be at theire disposeing). Allsoe I give to my Sonn Robert Williams children the like and to Edward Titus the like, Allsoe I give to Sara the daughter of Robert Jackson one yearling heyfer I give to my Sonn John Washborne one yearling and my morter & pestell at my death, or my wives I give to my beloved wife all the rest or remainder of my Cattle, wth my house and household goods to be at her disposeing, wth this Condition that yf shee remaine unmarried, But yf shee marry, then this is my will that these things shall be at my overseeres disposeing then this is my will, that she shall have fower Cowes, these Cowes to be wintered and summered free but not the increase to remaine to her Item I doe give her one mare & foale, and this howse or another built, Allsoe her firewood cut and brought home, fit for the fire free chardge. I give her ??? bushels of corne, fifteene of wheate, and fifteen of Indian and halfe an Accre of flax sowne and brought home, this to be donn yearly as long as she doth live, Allsoe she shall have all the householde goods at her disposeing, this gift to my Sonn Hope as yf he carry well & to the Likeing of my overseeres My overseeres that I appoint in this bueseines of wright is Mr Leverege, my Loveing wife, My sonn Robert Williams, Richard Willets my Sonnes-in law, I hope you will all of you accept of it, And be Careful yf God take mee Away by death: yf Hope accept of this gift from me he must be carefull (crossed out) be bound to Mannag the things for his mother. I give to my son John twoe ox pasture in the pasture, with five gates in the neck: This is my will and is not to stand in force till they heare of my death, this I acknowledge to be my owne will & testament.

Witnessed by Michaell Chadderton, Richard Willets, John Washborne.

* Transcribed by Mabel Thacher Rosemary Washburn, and printed by Elaine Washburn Olney in Our Washburn Heritage, 1986, p. 3.


Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 John A. Maltby - Connecticut Colony and Hempstead, Long Island - William Washburn
  2. Olney, Elaine Washburn, Our Washburn Heritage, 1986, [hereinafter Olney, Washburn], p. 2; and per email letter of Marilyn W. Powell of 18 Sept. 1996, taken from New York Historical Manuscripts, Vol. 4 of the Council of Minutes, 1638-1649.
  3. Stratford Historical Society - Stratford History
  4. Wikipedia - Stratford, Connecticut Colony
  5. Moore, Charles B., “The Early History of Hempstead, L.I.,” The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 10, [Jan. 1879], p. 13. His name was among a list of proprietors of Hempstead in 1647. Also listed by Moore as early proprietors of Hempstead in 1647 were Washburn’s sons-in-law Robert Jackson and Robert Williams.
  6. Olney, Elaine Washburn, Our Washburn Heritage, 1986, [hereinafter Olney, Washburn], p. 2; and per email letter of Marilyn W. Powell of 18 Sept. 1996, taken from New York Historical Manuscripts, Vol. 4 of the Council of Minutes, 1638-1649.
  7. Olney, Washburn, p. 3.
  8. Olney, Washburn, p. 3.
  9. Moore, Charles B., “The Early History of Hempstead, L.I.,” The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 10, [Jan. 1879], p. 13.
  10. Thompson, Neil D., “The English Origin of Sergeant Francis Nichols of Stratford, Connecticut,” The American Genealogist, Vol. 75, No. 4 [Oct. 2000], pp. 269-270. The parish registers and bishop’s transcripts for 1625 are missing for both Bengeworth and Sedgeberrow.
  11. Sedgeberrow Parish Registers, from FHL [Family History Library] microfilm #0905307, the marriage of Francis Nichols and Frances Wimarke was recorded on 24 Jan. 1599[/1600] in Sedgeberrow, Worcestershire
  12. Sedgeberrow Parish Registers, from FHL microfilm #0905307.
  13. Sedgeberrow Parish Registers, from FHL microfilm #0905307, the baptism of Francis Nicholls, son of John Nicholls, on 21 May 1575 in Sedgeberrow. The marriage of John Nicholls before 1575 was not found in the Sedgeberrow Parish Registers.
  14. Bishop’s Transcripts from St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0246641.
  15. Bunker, Mary Powell, Long Island Genealogies, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1976, [hereinafter Bunker, Long Island], p. 328; Torrey, Clarence Almon, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1987, [hereinafter Torrey, New England Marriages], p. 821.
  16. Calculated from the birth of their eldest child in about 1646.
  17. There is no proof that her name was Agnes. See Macy, Harry, Jr., “Robert Jackson’s Wives and Children,” The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 131, No. 1 [Jan. 2000], pp. 3-10.
  18. The Bishop’s Transcripts for St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, are missing for the years 1627 and 1628. Her birth year is estimated from her marriage of about 1652.
  19. Macy, Harry, Jr., “Robert Jackson’s Wives and Children,” The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 131, No. 1 [Jan. 2000], [hereinafter Macy, “Robert Jackson’s Wives and Children”], p. 10.
  20. The Bishop’s Transcripts of St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, are missing for the years 1628 and 1629. Her birth year was estimated from her marriage in about 1649.
  21. Calculated from the birth of their eldest son, Thomas, in 1650, and from Torrey, Clarence Almon, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1987, [hereinafter Torrey, New England Marriages], p.818.
  22. The Bishop’s Transcripts for St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, are missing for 1630 and 1631. His birth year was estimated from the date of his marriage in 1655.
  23. White, Lorraine Cook, The Barbour Index of Connecticut Town Vital Records: Stratford 1639-1840, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 2000, [hereinafter White, Barbour Index of Stratford VRs], p. 242, taken from Stratford Land Records, Vol. 1, p. 484; Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 783, which has the date as 17 June 1655.
  24. Davenport, Rev. James, The Washbourne Family of Little Washbourne and Wichenford in the County of Worcester, Methuen & Co., London, England, 1907, [hereinafter Davenport, Washbourne Family], p. 49. I did not find this burial entry in the Bishop’s Transcripts from St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, which were very hard to read for 1636
  25. The Bishop’s Transcripts for St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, are missing for 1634 and 1635. His birth year was calculated from the date of his marriage in 1660.
  26. Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 783.
  27. Bishop’s Transcripts from St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0246641.
  28. Bunker, Long Island, p. 103.
  29. Calculated from the birth of their eldest child in 1658.
  30. Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 23.
  31. Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT, Land Records, Vol. 2, p. 512, from FHL microfilm #002096, part 1, per email letter of Elaine Olney of 14 Sept. 2000.

See also:

  • Henry R. Stiles, History of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut, CD-Local and Family Histories: CT, 1600's - 1800's, (Produced in collaboration with the Genealogical Publishing Company, 2000), vol 2, p 720.
  • Donald Lines Jacobus, History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, CD-Local and Family Histories: CT, 1600's - 1800's, (Produced in collaboration with the Genealogical Publishing Company, 2000), vol 1, p 648. " ... Settled at Stratford and rem. to Hempstead, L. I. ..."
  • Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, Genealogies of Connecticut Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register ([CD]Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), vol 3, p 590.

Acknowledgments

  • Thanks to Katharine E for entering this profile. Click the Changes tab for the details of contributions by Katharine and others.


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Comments: 5

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I found that the only Washburn in the Great Migration Directory is John Washburn, supposedly William's brother; William is NOT listed. The biography says that he migrated before 1647; so apparently Anderson also found no evidence that he was in New England by 1640.

The Puritan Great Migration project box should probably be removed, as well as PGM as co-manager.

PGM removed. Profile cleaned up. There was a lot of duplication
posted by Jillaine Smith
I have in my possession copy No. 77 of

A genealogical History of the Washburns of Huron County, Ohio, complied by Mildred J Smith Parkinson. Milwaukee, Wis. 1954.

I would be willing send it to someone who could put it to good use. It is of no value to me but I don't want it to be lost, should it be unique.

posted by Tom Bredehoft
Tom try posting on G2G, if you get no response from this.
posted by Anne B
There is a substantial amount of redundant information that has been placed under Notes (after Acknowledgements) herein, most of which should probably be removed or incorporated into the main Bio.

If the PM's here would weigh in on this issue, it would be appreciated.

William is 12 degrees from Cecil B. DeMille, 19 degrees from Rosalie Neve and 11 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.