Noah Webster Jr. L.L.D.

Noah Webster Jr. L.L.D. (1758 - 1843)

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Noah Webster Jr. L.L.D.
Born in West Hartford, Hartford, Connecticutmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Boston, Suffolk, MAmap
Descendants descendants
Died in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, USAmap
Profile last modified | Created 13 Oct 2011
This page has been accessed 2,666 times.

Categories: American Founding Fathers | American Revolution.

Noah Webster Jr. L.L.D. served during the American Revolution
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Contents

Biography

American lexicographer and textbook author whose name became synonymous with "dictionary", especially the modern Merriam-Webster dictionary that was first published in 1828.

Noah Webster was born at W. Hartford, CT, married in 1789(age 31) at Boston, MA to Rebecca Greenleaf, of Boston. They were both teachers at an Academy in Philadelphia. She is dau of William & Mary (Brown) Greenleaf, the first High Sheriff of Boston.

He entered Yale in 1774, walking to class in New Haven from his father's farm. His father mortgaged the farm to pay the tuition. At this time, Yale College had 150 students and 2 professors & 3 tutors. A degree consisted of 4yrs spent in the acquisition of Latin & Greek, a smattering of mathematics, logic, rhetoric & metaphysics. A few months after he started school came the thrilling story of victory at Lexington & Concord, followed by Bunker Hill. His education was interrupted in 1777.

At the advance of Gen.Burgoyne's Army and a large band of Indians, the West Hartford militia, commanded by his father, including Noah & his brothers, marched to the Hudson & was part of a brilliant victory. Burgoyne's surrender played a large part in the subsequent American victory & the militia, with all 4 Websters, came home heroes. In 1778, Noah graduated from Yale. His father gave him an eight-dollar bill of the Continental currency, worth about $4 in silver.

He was a prodigious worker. He wished to be a lawyer, but his aptitude led him steadily toward philology and his monumental work, "The American Dictionary of the English Language". He taught school & began to formulate the basis for his famous spelling book, one of the foremost textbooks of its kind. He was principal of an academy in Philadelphia, where he met his wife. He wrote valuable summaries for the Constitutional Convention which was in session in 1787. He delivered lectures on the English Language. He moved to New York in 1788 and established a magazine which failed. The following year he returned to Hartford and began to practice law. His practice became large and profitable. In 1793 he again went to NYC and started a magazine and a newspaper. In 1798, he became one of the founders of the college in Amhert, MA & president of the first board of trustees. In 1822 he returned to New Haven, CT & he was honored by Yale College with a doctorate degree(LL.D).

He published in 1799 two volumes on Epidemics. In 1802 he wrote on the origins of Banking & Insurance. In 1807 he published "Philosophical and Practical Grammar of the English Language", a text for standardized spelling & grammar. For 36 years he labored in the production of his Dictionary and in his 70th yr -1828- he brought it to completion and published its first edition in two volumes."The American Dictionary of the English Language" was the first book of its kind in America. The work attempted to define the words of the English language as spoken in America. It had required a trip to Europe in 1824 with two months at Paris at the Royal Library and 8 mos at Cambridge University in England. He finished the work in Jan 1825. A revised edition was published in 1841with a preface written by Noah Webster himself, telling of the production of the work.

He and Rebecca had 7 children. Noah died in New Haven, CT in 1843 at age 85. He is buried with his wife in the Grove Street Cemetery.

Early in his life he was interested in the genealogy of the Webster Family. In 1836 he prepared an 8 page pamphlet entitled, "Genealogy. Family of John Webster. Compiled by N. Webster." Several things he printed have since been dis-proven. He also erected the monument at the Old Hadley Cemetery in 1818, honoring Gov. John & the others who founded Hadley


Noah's house is still standing in West Hartford, Conn. on the direct road, about one mile south of the church, which stands in the center of town. His grandfather was of the first settlers in Hartford and governor of Connecticut. His mother was a descendant of William Bradford, of Plymouth, Connecticut. He entered Yale in 1774 and he had been but a few months in college when the thrilling story or Lexington and Concord came, followed soon by Bunker Hill.

General Washington and his staff passed through New Haven on his way to take command of the revolutionary force gathered in Cambridge. They lodged there, and in the morning were invited to see the drill of a company of the students, who finally escorted General Washington as far on his way as Neck Bridge. Webster had the honor of leading the way, blowing a fife. In the third year of his course, on account of the war, college life in New Haven was broken up, and the classes were dispersed in various towns. Webster's class went to Glastonbury, and on the alarm by the approach toward Connecticut of Burgoyne, accompanied by a large band of savage Indians, a company went from West Hartford, commanded by Deacon Webster, and in that company went his three sons, Noah among them. This company took part in the brilliant victories which ended in Burgoyne's surrender. The following year Noah finished his college course.

"The significance of Noah Webster's Dictionary and his Spelling Book can be appreciated only when they are viewed against the background spanned by his life.

He was born on an eighty-acre Connecticut farm the year before Wolfe's victory on the Plain of Abraham, and lived to see American pioneers penetrate overland into California and Oregon.

He was a small boy when the Stamp Act aroused the colonists, and a student at Yale when college classes were dispersed into the interior towns by the menace of British landing parties. He marched with his father against Burgoyne.

In 1785, moved by the incompetence of the thirteen sovereign States, he wrote a widely circulated argument for national union.

In 1787 he issued an influential pamphlet advocating the adoption of the Federal Constitution. From 1793 to 1798 he owned, managed and edited a daily and a weekly newspaper in New York City, supporting the Federalist policies of Washington and Adams. Living under the first ten presidents, he witnessed the acquisition of the Louisiana Territory and Florida, the admission of thirteen additional states and the approaching annexation of Texas. Out of his patriotism and nationalism inspired by this sweep of events came the conviction that lusty young America needed its own schoolbooks, its own uniform language, and its own intellectual life. Into the attainment of these ends Webster flung himself with insatiable curiosity and indomitable energy.

His American Spelling Book (which taught not only spelling but pronunciation, common sense, morals, and good citizenship) was partly provoked by his efforts to use Dilworth's English Spelling Book while he was teaching school in Connecticut, New York, and Philadelphia. His dictionaries (Compendious 1806, American 1828) were suggested partly by his resentment against the ignorance concerning American institutions shown in contemporary British dictionaries. All his life he was a defender and interpreter of the American political "experiment," with all its cultural implications. His Dictionaries and his Spelling book grew out of an intimate and vital familiartity with American life. He knew the farm, the law, the city, the school, and politics. He knew the country as a whole - he had traveled (1785-1786) by horse, by carriage, and by sailing vessel from Massachusetts to South Carolina, persuading State legislatures to pass laws for the protection of copyright. He was a spelling reformer, an orchardist, a gardener, and an experimental scientist.

He was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court. ----------------- Noah's house is still standing in West Hartford, Conn. on the direct road, about one mile south of the church, which stands in the center of town. His grandfather was of the first settlers in Hartford and governor of Connecticut. His mother was a descendant of William Bradford, of Plymouth, Connecticut. He entered Yale in 1774 and he had been but a few months in college when the thrilling story or Lexington and Concord came, followed soon by Bunker Hill.

General Washington and his staff passed through New Haven on his way to take command of the revolutionary force gathered in Cambridge. They lodged there, and in the morning were invited to see the drill of a company of the students, who finally escorted General Washington as far on his way as Neck Bridge. Webster had the honor of leading the way, blowing a fife. In the third year of his course, on account of the war, college life in New Haven was broken up, and the classes were dispersed in various towns. Webster's class went to Glastonbury, and on the alarm by the approach toward Connecticut of Burgoyne, accompanied by a large band of savage Indians, a company went from West Hartford, commanded by Deacon Webster, and in that company went his three sons, Noah among them. This company took part in the brilliant victories which ended in Burgoyne's surrender. The following year Noah finished his college course.

Christening

22 Oct 1758 West Hartford, Hartford, CT

Burial

31 May 1843 Grove Street Cem, New Haven, Connecticut

Sources

The North-Carolina Standard newspaper June 7, 1843 https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042147/1843-06-07/ed-1/seq-2/

Webster's New International Dictionary (G & C Merriam, 1950) s

http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:Noah_Webster_(4)

Webster's Dictionary
History & Genealogy of the Gov. John Webster Family of Connecticut.. (E.R. Andrews Printing Cp, Rochester, N.Y. 1915), Chapt 8 p.178
Noah Webster - Wikipedia
Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
Find A Grave Memorial# 1084


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Noah by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree: It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Noah:

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Collaboration

On 9 Mar 2015 at 22:11 GMT Cathryn (Hallett) Hondros wrote:

On 10 Feb 2015 at 00:32 GMT Cathryn (Hallett) Hondros wrote:



Noah is 17 degrees from Robin Helstrom, 22 degrees from Katy Jurado and 15 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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