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Johan Rudolph (Wehmeyer) Waymire (1725 - 1801)

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Johann Johan Rudolph (John) "Ludolph" [uncertain] Waymire formerly Wehmeyer aka Wehmeyer
Born in Hanover, Stadt Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germanymap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married in Hanover, Germanymap
Husband of — married in Randolph, North Carolinamap
Descendants descendants
Died in Randolph County, North Carolinamap
Wehmeyer-3 created 26 Aug 2010 | Last modified | Last edit: 16 Oct 2017
13:44: Joey KiKi Mueller edited the Biography for John (Wehmeyer) Waymire. [Thank Joey KiKi for this]
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Biographies

John Rudolph Waymire (originally Wehmeyer) was an officer in the body guard of Frederick the Great. He was made a provincial governor. He fought in the Battle of Dettingen in Germany on June 27, 1743. (Internet-no documentation).

John and his family (including his parents, his sisters, wife, and children) came to America from Germany in the summer of 1753. They came on the ship Leathley and landed at Philadelphia Sept. 19, 1753. He settled in rural PA where his father died in 1757. That same year John moved his family to Randolph Co. NC where he lived the rest of his life. John is listed in the DAR Patriot Index as a soldier from NC.

Will-Randolph Co. NC Will book 2, p. 85. 26 July 1801. ....First I give to my son Frederick Waymire, Rosana Yount, Tamar Phouts, Molly Pouts, Elizabeth Hoover, Nancy Younts, Catherine Summers, and Margaret Kinley, each them 5 shillings sterling.

Second, Is give to my son, Daniel, 150 acres of land including the plantation whereon he now lives....also I give to my son Jacob 200 acres....also I give to my son David 131 acres....I give to my son Henry 150 acres....I give to my son Rudolph 150 acres....they shall pay to my other 2 sons Valintine and Soloman so much as to make them all equal.

Also I give to my beloved wife Molly 1/3rd that is made on the said land...also I leave to my wife Molly the rest of my household property until my youngest son Solomon comes of age...money equally divided between my 7 sons namely Daniel, Valentine, Jacob, David, Henry, Rudolph, and Solomon...

Most of his children moved to OH.

From Margo McBride:

JOHN RUDOLPH WAYMIRE Born Johan Ludolph Weymeyer in Hanover, Germany (called Prussia) in 1725, the son of John Valentine (Johan Voltine Weymeyer). Hanover lies west of Berlin in the Uplands.

Since 1701 the country had been ruled by the House of Hohenzollern, who called themselves the "Kings of Prussia." Frederick William I had created a military state and by 1740, when his son Frederick II (called "Frederick the Great") took over, they had made Prussia one of the strongest military powers in Europe.

John Rudolph grew to be a tall man with great physical strength. He served his mandatory enlistment in the army of Frederick II and afterwards, he was kept on by the King as a personal bodyguard. The physical requirements to become a bodyguard were a minimum height of 6'6" and minimum weight of 225+ lbs, but he qualified easily.

He showed such courage and executive abilities that the King made him governor of one of the provinces they had seized in a battle. But this relationship deteriorated when he began refusing to follow orders that he didn't agree with, and for speaking out in public about his complaints. Sometime after he began military service, he joined the Society of Friends (Quakers) whose beliefs were against andy type of military actions whatever. He began speaking against the military policies of the country and was warned to keep quiet. He was finally charged with insubordination and put in prison for 30 days, but as soon as he was released he began publicly criticizing things again, saying that people weren't being treated fairly, and that he intended to leave the country if things didn't change. His comments got him imprisoned for a second time. This time he evidently learned that if he wanted to stay alive, he had to keep his opinions to himself. He served another 30 days, and while in jail, quietly started making plans to leave Prussia and take his family to AMERICA.

In the summer of 1753, at the age of 28, he boareded "The Leathley" at Hamburg. He took his wife and two small children, his parents, and two sisters. He signed the boarding list for himself and his father. Unfortunately the names of women and children weren't required, so we don't know the first names of his mother and sisters. His daughters Eleanor Melinda, 4 and Rosannah, 2, are most likely the ones who journeyed with him. A third daughter, Elizabeth, was born July 12, probably on board ship during the three month trip, but only two children were on the passenger list when he boarded.

On the the voyage, his mother became very ill. She died on the ship and was buried at sea.

When they landed in Philadepphia on September 19, 1753, his two sisters somehow separated from the family in all the confusion of leaving the ship, and although he searched and searched, he would never see them or hear from them again. The separation from his own country, the loss of his sisters and his mother's death haunted him forever, and he suffered from terrible nightmares and visions.

After living here ashort time, he changed his name from Johan Ludolph Weymeyer to the more acceptable John Rudolph Waymire. His father changed his name from Johan Voltine Weyermeyer to John Valentine Waymire. They settled in Pennsylvania and began farming, but the ocean journey, the loss of his family, and the rough life here was too much for his father, who died in 1757, only 4 years after arriving.

John Rudolph took his wife and children and moved to Guilford County (now called Randolph Co.) North Carolina, and settled on the Uwharie River. Although the river valleys in North Carolina were fertile, they were narrow and flooded often. The land outside the river valleys was rocky and the ground filled with clay. Farming was difficult, but John continued there for many years. Altogether, he and his wife had 8 children: 7 daughters and 1 son. We are descended from their daughter Eleanor Malinda Waymire, who married Jacob Fouts. Their descendants still hold Fouts-Waymire Family Reunions in Richmond, Indiana.

It isn't known when his 1st wife died, but sometime around 1775 at the age of about 50, he married for the second time, to Elizabeth "Molly" Louck. He started another family and had 7 sons. His last son, Solomon Waymire, was born when John Rudolph was 66! Surprisingly for those times, all 15 of his children grew to be adults, all married and all had children, remarkable for those times. (Must have been God's promised blessings for the descendants of a righteous man!)

In July of 1801 he wrote his will, and he died sometime between July and November, when his estate went into probate, naming his wife "Molly" and children. He was 76 years old.

Eventually the land in North Carolina wasn't producing enough crops, so after his death, his children began moving away to the "New Land" called Ohio. The soil was richer, and because the Waymires were Quakers, they wanted to live somewhere where slavery wasn't tolerated. By 1808, 50 years after John Rudolph came to North Carolina, his children had all oved to Ohio. Some stayed there, others moved farther and farther west.


See also: wife Dorothea Elisabeth Loock (Waymeyer)


Emigrated in 1753 with his wife Elizabeth, four children; Frederick, Rosannah, Eleanor, and Elizabeth; his widowed father Valentine; his sister Mary and perhaps another relative named Sarah. He worked on a farm for about 4 years in Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia but location other wise unknown. He migrated in 1757 to North Carolina along the Uwharrie River.[1]

Immigration: Sept 19, 1753 in Port of Philadelphia on the ship Leathley[2]

Residence: 1800 - Hillsboro, Randolph, North Carolina[3][4]

Peggy Stegel Research
From a newspaper in Niedersachen, Germany:"Duederode. Why would Americans travel over the Pond to participate at the 950th anniversary of the village of Duederode? Quite easy, because their roots are here. Dr. Friedel H. Wehmeier, Edward D. Waymire and Peggy Stone Tegel presented the results of the genealogy of the Wehmeyer Family at the festivities on Saturday mornig in form of a book with the title, "The Quest for John Rudolph Waymire." (Die Suche nach John Rudolph Waymire).
Everything goes back to progenitor Johann Ludolf Wehmeyer, who in 1721 saw the light of day in Duederode. He emmigrated with his family in 1753, to America, first walking seven days to Hamburg, , followed by a two-month voyage on a sailing ship. The man from Duederode became John Rudolph Waymire. He had 15 children by his two wives, and over time more than 20,000 descendants have been born, those of today living across the width and breadth of the United States. No doubt, the most famous of these was Herbert C. Hoover, learned the participants of the festivity in the banqueting barn of rarmer Arend. He was none other than the American President from 1929 to 1933.

The Wehmeyer descendants have hoped for many years to find the village in Hanover where he came from, Peggy Stone Tegel reported. The actual finding came from Dr. Wehmeier, the idea to write the book from Edward Waymire, also a descendant. The Mayor of Duederode, Sybille Freifrau von Olderhausen, received a copy of the publication."

"He fought with the allied German-English armies in the Battle of Dettingen am Main against the French (June 27, 1743) the last and final battle in a series of clashes caused by the wars of the Austrian succession." John was a patriot and a supporter of the American Revolutionary War effort. Family tradition states that after their patriarch's death, opposition to slavery incited the entire remaining Waymire family to leave North Carolina and migrate to Ohio and Indiana where the family multilplied and spread out over the United States." Peggy Stegel.

From the "Genealogy of the Hoover Family"..."John Rudolph Waymire was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1725. He was tall, erect, and of great physical strength. After having served his term of military service as required, he was retained by the King as an officer in his bodyguard. Minimum physical requirements for this unit were six feet six, two hundred twenty five pounds. The King, being impressed by Waymire's executive ability and undaunted courage, made him governor of the province that had recently been acquired through conquest. But he soon aroused the displeasure of the King by refusing to execute a mandate he considered unjust. for this insubordination, he was thrown into prison for thirty days. Upon release, he openly voiced his displeasure of the punishment and vowed that he would leave the country.

For this, he was again placed in prison and his property confiscated. Upon release he was able, with the aid of friends, to make his way to America; sailing on the ship 'Leathley' from Hamburg, with his father, mother, wife, two children and two sisters. His mother died at sea, and upon arrival in America, the two sisters were sold into servitude, to pay for their passage, and were never heard from again.

John Waymire with his family, located in William Penn's settlement in Pennsylvania, where his father died in 1757. That year he and his wife and children joined the ox-cart migration to Randolph Co. North Carolina, and settled on the Uwharrie River, near the Hoovers. Here he lived until his death in 1801."

Emigrated from Hanover, Germany. It is stated in David Hoover's Memoirs that He used to boast that he served under his Britannic Majesty and that he was at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743. He also, it is said, served under Frederick the Great in a company into which no man was admitted who was not seven feet tall.
Governor of the Province
Randolph county, North Carolina records.
Dayton, Montgomery, Ohio records.
Miami county, Ohio, history.
Died sometime between 26 July - November 1, 1801.
No Waymires on the German IGI.
This story about John Waymire is from the Hoover Genealogy..."John Rudolph Waymire, the progenitor, was a native of Hanover, Germany. He served under George II, King of England and Elector of Hanover, and was at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, where the French were defeated by the Germans.

He was a descendant of what were called the High-White Dutch, and was chosen as one of the King's escort in consequence of his consanguinity, physical stature and military courage. It is said that he also served under Frederick The Great, King of Prussia; that he incurred the displeasure of that monarch by his independent manner. During a conversation with the King, he disclosed his intention of visiting North America, upon which Frederick told him he had use for him and could not let him go. And to conquer his bold and independent spirit, he threw him into prison, which treatment caused him to quit the service of his royal master and leave the Fatherland, emigrating with his family to a land beyond the sea, where he could enjoy the freedom he so much yearned for. It is also said that a fortress is still standing in the city of Hanover, which was erected by forces that were under command of John Rudolph Waymire. He first settled in Pennsylvania and afterwards moved to North Carolina, where he died. He is described as having been remarkable for his great size, strength, energy and iron will. He left a son and seven daughters by his first wife and seven sons by a second wife, from whom has sprung, perhaps, as large a family of descendants as there is in the United States.

They nearly all emigrated from North Carolina to Ohio about the year 1802, and his descendants are to be found in almost every Western state and territory, and number several thousand. Among the most prominent family names of the various branches of the Waymire family are the Younts, Fouts, Hoovers and Kindleys, the Hoovers being the most numerous in this vicinity."

The certificate from the North Carolina Historical Commission states that the name R."Weamire" occurs on the North Carolina revolutionary Army Accounts, Vol 7 page 14-Folio 1, and that Certificate #1338 to R. Waymire

From Records of William M. Reser, M.D. "Johan Ludolph Weymeyer" John Rudolph Waymire with his family, including the father settled somewhere in the rural districts of Penn. where the father died. The family moved to what is now Randolph co. John Ludolph Wehemeyer was born in Hanover, Germany in 1725. He was tall, erect and of great physical strength. After having served his term of military service as required in those days, he was retained by the king as an officer in his body guard. Six feet six inches in height and two hundred twenty-five pounds in weight was the minimum physical requirement to become a member of this unit.

His name is listed as both Johann Ludolph Wahemeyer and John Ruldolph Waymire. It is reported that the Baptismal Record indicates his godfather was “Johan Ludolph”, thus the unusual middle name.

The King being impressed by his executive ability and undaunted courage, soon made him governor of a province that had recently been acquired through conquest. Ere long, he aroused the displeasure of the king by refusing to execute a mandate which he considered unjust. For this insubordination he was thrown into prison for thirty days. Upon release he openly voiced his displeasure of the punishment bestowed and vowed he would leave the country. The King hearing of this had him again placed in prison for a like period of time. This did not dispel his anger but taught him to be more cautious of his speech. So, he quietly made plans to go to America.

In the summer of 1753, he with his wife and two children, his father and mother, and two sisters took passage at Hamburg on the ship Leathley. After a long and perilous journey of several weeks, during which is mother died and was buried at sea, the party landed at Philadelphia on September 19, 1753. In the Pennsylvania archives is the ship list of the Leathley for this trip in which appears the name "Johan Ludolph Weymeyer" signed by himself in a very legible hand. The spelling of the name plainly shows that it had not as yet been anglicized. The women and children on that ship were not named. Upon landing in Philadelphia, the sisters were separated from the other members of the family and never seen again.

John Rudolph with his family, including his father, settled somewhere in the rural districts of Pennsylvania, where his father died in 1757. That same year the family moved to what is now Randolph county, North Carolina and settled on the Uwharie river. Here he remained for the rest of his days and is buried in the hills.

He was married twice, his German wife's name was Lough. She bore him eight children: the first one being a boy, all the others, girls. His second wife was Elizabeth Louck, but his will states "my beloved wife Molly". She may have been named Mary Elizabeth. She bore him seven children, all boys. They were Quakers and living in North Carolina which recognized slavery was galling to them. Upon their father's death, they took their families and moved to Ohio. By 1808 all had migrated to Warren, Montgomery, and Miami counties in Ohio. Some remained here while others soon migrated farther west and scattered in different directions until today, his descendants are found throughout all parts of the United States. [5]


Dr. William Reser
Taking so long for the journey, longer than they had expected, the two sisters having limited financial means, could pay for but half the voyage. John Rudolph, wife and two children had just enough to land them on shore.
On account of the mothers death shortening the period of requiring rations the father had enough to complete the voyage. They being strangers and no one able to pay the balance due from the sisters, these were put on the block and sold for labor, or as slaves, for it was the custom in those days

If one failed to have money to pay transportation, or "passage Money" as they called it they were sold for the purpose of reimbursing the debt. Upon landing in Philadelphia the purchaser of the two sisters hurried away with them, and in spite of subsequent searching John Rudolph was never able to see or hear of them again and he always worried over this misfortune.

He, his wife and two children and his father settled for a short time in Pennsylvania and while there the father died, in the year 1757; and in the same year he and his family moved to North Carolina, Guilford, Co. where he spent the remainder of his days. His German wife died leaving him with eight children, one boy and seven girls.

In the year 1775 he married Miss (?) Elizabeth Louck (which is my great-great grandmother-WM. Reser)

To this union was born seven children, all boys making fifteen children, all of whom lived to manhood and womanhood, married and had large families of their own and they all moved to Ohio between 1799 and 1806 inclusive.[6]

Change Date: 20 NOV 2002
Contact: James Shearer JCShearer@gtlakes.com


Dr. William Reser
John Rudolph Waymire was born in Hanover, Germany about the year 1725.

He was tall, erect and of great physical strength. After having served his term of military service as required in those days, he was retained by the king as an officer in his body guard. Six feet six inches in height and two hundred and twenty-five pounds in weight was the minimum physical requirement to become a member of this unit.

The king being impressed by his executive ability and undaunted courage, soon made him governor of a province that had recently been acquired through conquest. Ere long, he aroused the displeasure of the king by refusing to execute a mandate which he considered unjust. For this insubordination he was thrown into prison for thirty days. Upon release he openly voiced his displeasure of the punishment bestowed and vowed he would leave the country. The king hearing of this had him again placed in prison for a like period of time. This did not dispel his anger but taught him to be more cautious of his speech. So he quietly made his plans to go to America. In the summer of 1753, he, with his wife and two children, his father and mother and two sisters, took passage at Hamburg on the ship Leathley.

After a long and perilous journey of several weeks, during which the mother died and was buried at sea, the party landed at Philadelphia September 19, 1753. In the Pennsylvania archives is the Ship List of the Leathley for this trip in which appears the name "Johan Ludolph Weymeyer" signed by himself in a very legible hand. The spelling of the name plainly shows that it had not as yet been anglicized. In the same list appears the name "Voltine Weymeyer" signed by himself. Probably this was the father, although tradition has always stated his name was John. He may have had a double name, John Valentine. The women and children on that boat were not listed; to us a very regrettable omission, because if they had been we would have learned their given names.

Upon landing in Philadelphia, the sisters were separated from the other members of the family and never afterwards were seen or heard of. John Rudolph with his family, including the father settled somewhere in the rural districts of Pennsylvania, to us not known, where the father died in 1857. That same year the family moved to what is now Randolph County, North Carolina and settled on the Uwharrie River. At that time Guilford County included, among other lands, the territory within the present boundaries of Randolph County. Here he resided the remainder of his days; and it was here on one of the clay hills of the old North State that his remains were laid to rest. His death occurred in 1801, some time between July 26th, and Nov. 1st. We thus fix the time by the fact that his will was written July 26, 1801 and probated at the first of the November term of court the same year.

He was twice married. Unverified tradition states his first, or German wife's name was Lough. She bore him eight children; the fist one being a boy, all the others, girls. His second wife, according to tradition, was Miss Elizabeth Louck, but his will states "my beloved wife Molly". She may have been named Mary Elizabeth. She bore him seven children, all boys: making a total of fifteen children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, married and had families. It is conservatively estimated that up to the present timed Rudolph Waymire has had more than thirty thousand descendants. These people, mainly farmers, were not altogether pleased with the agricultural conditions of North Carolina. The river valleys were very fertile, but narrow and subject to disastrous floods at the time of freshets; the rest of the land was rock infested, clayey hills, mostly impossible to cultivate and non productive. Then again, this state permitted the institution of slavery, and, as most of these people were Quakers, it was galling to their natures to constantly witness around them the workings of this iniquitous, barbarous system.

Because of these conditions and environments they had for some time contemplated migrating to the new lands in the northwest. Immediately after the death of the father the children began the exodus from the old North State and by 1808 had all migrated to Ohio, settling at first in Warren, Montgomery, and Miami Counties. Some remained here while others soon migrated farther west and scattered in different directions until, today, his descendants are found throughout all parts of the United States and Canada.[7]

Notes: This entry of the date of Voltine Weymeyer's death is not a typographical error on my part, but one would think must have been on the part of Dr. Reser. It seems hardly likely that Voltine Weymeyer lived over 152 years, even given the historically extreme longevity of the Waymire lines. If John Rudolph was born in 1725, and even given that Voltine fathered him at the age of 15, the nearest date for Voltine's birth would have to be 1705, making Voltine at least 152 years old in 1857. It is much more likely that he was much older, and died in 1757, only three years after the family's arrival in America. pkw

Note that John Rudolph Weymeyer would have been about 76 years old at the time of his death, quite an advanced age at that period in our history. pkw

dRemember, this text was written in 1925

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1538-1940

Wehmeyer, Johann Ludolff Place : Philadelphia

Year : 1753

Primary Individual : Wehmeyer, Johann Ludolff

Source Code : 9041

Source Name : STRASSBURGER, RALPH BEAVER. Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808. Edited by William John Hinke. Norristown [PA]:

Pennsylvania German Society, 1934. 3 vols. Vols. 1 and 3 reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1964. Repr. 1983. Vol. 1. 1727-1775. 776p.

Source Annotation : Contains 29,800 names, with annotations written by Krebs (see no. 4203). Various references to the names in Strassburger will be found in other listings, mostly where authors have attempted to line up their information with that in Strassburger. This work (often referred to as Strassburger and Hinke) is much superior to no. 7820, Rupp, and no. 1804, Egle. It forms a revision with additions to Rupp and Egle, and was prepared and edited with great accuracy. Vol. 1 contains captains' lists, 1727-1775; vol. 2 has facsimiles of all signatures of signers of oaths of allegiance and oaths of abjuration, and was not included in the G.P.C. reprint; vol. 3 has captains' lists from 1785-1808, and indexes to captains, ships, ports of departure, and surnames in all volumes. The set was originally vols. 42-44 of the Pennsylvania German Society Proceedings.

Source Page # : 538


Dr. William Reser
"Great-Great-Grandfather, on Mothers side."

"John Rudolph Waymire was a son of John Waymire and was born in Hanover Germany about the year 1725. They lived in the High-land and were called the High White Dutch. The Highlanders were of large statue and Rudolph was a man of great physical strength, being tall and erect weighing over 200 pounds."

"He was in the military service for a number of years. He was an officer and while in the service erected a fort upon which, in his honor, his name was inscribed and it is there to this day."

"After his term of service had expired, he was retained by the King, Frederick the Great as an officer of his body-guard. (In which physical requirements were at least six feet tall and two hundred and twenty five in weight) Later on he was made provincial governor over a new district acquired by conquest. Being a man of a free and independent disposition and of undoubted courage he refused to execute a mandate of the King which he considered unjust, and for this insubordination he was thrown in prison for a term of 30 days. After his release he openly avowed his determination to be a free man and that he would go to America where he could be free. Freely expressing thus in public the King heard of it and placed him in prison for a second time. This second imprisonment caused him to be more careful of his speech and to keep his determinations to himself. He then secretly made arrangements to leave the country and having procured passports, he with his wife and two children, his father and mother and two sisters, sailed for America. This was about the year 1750. They had a long and tedious voyage between three and six months. About midway of the ocean the mother died, her body was lashed to a plank weighted with iron or lead and thrown overboard. This was so revolting to him that he ever afterward expressed his horror of it."

This individual was found on GenCircles at: http://www.gencircles.com/users/jcshearer/1/data/1124

This individual was found on GenCircles at: http://www.gencircles.com/users/belvois/6/data/260

THE EMIGRANT'S TRUNK The trunk the Waymire family brought with them when they crossed the ocean in emigrating from Germany in 1753. It had been handed down, at first, because of its utility and later on account of sentiment. Finally it was placed in a museum of old relics in the library of Richmond, Indiana. The spirit of this utilitarian age crowded it out of its conspicuous resting place and it was stowed away in an attic of one of the descendants, Joseph C. Ratliff. When the owner of the attic died, the family connection with the trunk was broken and it came near being lost, because the property was sold, and the new owners not knowing its history placed it in the stable loft, where it was found almost accidentally on August 14, 1921, and restored to its place among family relics.

This trunk is covered with skin to which the hair remains attached, and has rawhide hinges that have withstood usage for one and three quarter centuries.

1 NAME Johann Ludolph /Wehmeyer/

Left Hamburg, Germany for America in the summer of 1753 aboard the ship Leathley with Father, Mother, 1 Sister, Wife, and 3 or 4 Children. Dr Reser lists 2 sisters but no record has been found of another sister so it might have been a relative. Landed at Philadelphia, PA 19 Sept 1753. Mother died at sea. Settled in rural PA. Moved to NC sometime after 1757 after the death of his father. Andreas Valentin. Fought in the Battle of Dettington (Dettingen) in 1743. First recorded in Rowan Co, NC (now Randolph Co) in the 1768 Early Tax List. Next in NC, Randolph Co in 1779 Tax ListNext in NC, Randolph Co in 1790 Federal Census[8]

_RIN: 3 1 Change Date: 27 FEB 2009 at 15:22:11


Sources

  • RootsWeb.com Pedigree - Decendents & Ancestors of Ron Zimmerman

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=zimm42&id=I269

  1. FamilySearch.Org - The Quest for John Rudolph Waymire, Waymire Family Research Group)
  2. Genesearch.Com - The Ship Leathley Passenger List - Johann Ludolff Wehmeyer
  3. 1800 United States Federal Census - Year: 1800; Census place: Hillsboro, Randolph, North Carolina; Roll: 32; Page: 346; Image: 352; Family History Library Film: 337908
  4. Notes on the History of Randolph County, NC
  5. Peggy Stegel Research
  6. Written by Dr. William Reser
  7. Excerpt from " John Rudolph Waymire and The First Three Generations of His Descendants", edited by William M. Reser, M.D., Lafayette, Indiana, 1925.1 (Source Page # : 538)
  8. Notes for JOHN RUDOLPH WAYMIRE, written by Dr William Reser

Acknowledgements



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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with John by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with John:

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Collaboration

On 11 Jun 2017 at 13:04 GMT Schalk Pienaar wrote:

Waymeyer-2 and Waymire-5 appear to represent the same person because: Same wife, same date of death and place. Slight difference in LNAB.

On 15 Apr 2017 at 17:57 GMT Joey KiKi Mueller wrote:

Family Structure, Life Sketch/ Biography, Christening Record and Last Will references:

[1] Same family?

On 15 Apr 2017 at 17:51 GMT Joey KiKi Mueller wrote:

Family Structure, Life Sketch / Biography, Christening Record and Last Will references on this site: [1]

Same people?

On 15 Apr 2017 at 15:20 GMT Joey KiKi Mueller wrote:

Waymire-88 and Waymire-92 appear to represent the same person because: Another, one I started before seeing the others.

On 15 Apr 2017 at 15:08 GMT Joey KiKi Mueller wrote:

Waymire-5 and Wehmeyer-3 appear to represent the same person because: These may be the same person, same dates and there seem to be multiple profiles for people in this family group, name spellings vary slightly, as a group they fit with Yount connections. Is anyone else finding these problems, or am I completely wrong and should start new profiles for my connections?

Thank you for your time, Joey

On 15 Apr 2017 at 14:54 GMT Joey KiKi Mueller wrote:

Waymire-5 and Waymire-88 appear to represent the same person because: Could these be duplicates? I have Mariann Waymire Yount and a Rosanna Waymire Yount as sisters married to 2 brothers William Henry Yount and George Yount they appear to have the same parents: John Rudolph Waymire (Johann Ludlow Wehmeyer) and possibly different mothers: Dorothea Elisabeth Lough and/or Mary Elizabeth Louck. Any help on this would be appreciated.

Thank-you for your time, Joey



John is 18 degrees from Kevin Bacon, 15 degrees from Joseph Broussard, 18 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II Windsor and 18 degrees from Isabella I de Castilla y León on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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