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Ceawlin Wessex (abt. 0535 - 0593)

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Ceawlin Wessex
Born about in Wessexmap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Son of and [mother unknown]
[spouse(s) unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Wessexmap [uncertain]
Profile last modified | Created 1 Oct 2010 | Last significant change: 10 Nov 2018
11:42: EditBot WikiTree edited the Biography for Ceawlin Wessex. (Redirecting:Euro_Prior_to_742) [Thank EditBot for this]
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Categories: Famous People before 900 | Uncertain Existence | Ancient Royals and Aristocrats Project | House of Wessex.

Research suggests that this person may never have existed. See the text for details.
European Aristocracy
Ceawlin Wessex was a member of aristocracy in ancient Europe.
Join: European Ancient Royals and Aristocrats Project
Discuss: ancient_euroaristo

Contents

Biography

The House of Wessex crest.
Ceawlin Wessex is a member of the House of Wessex.
Preceded by
Cynric
King of the West Saxons
560 - 592
Succeeded by
Ceol

No mother or spouses are reliably attested for Ceawlin. Any linking of a mother or a spouse without the express agreement of the EuroAristo project in the G2G forum will be disconnected.



Research Notes

Parentage

The Anglo Saxon Chronicle names Ceawlin as son of Cynric, in its recitation of the ancestry of Æthelwulf King of Wessex. This leaves the impression of an after-thought, as none of the passages in the earlier parts of the Chronicle which record Ceawlin’s activity state that he was Cynric’s son.

Battle of Beranburh

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Cynric and Ceawlin" fought the Britons in 552 at "Beranburh" [Barbury castle].

Reign

He succeeded in 560 as Ceawlin, King of Wessex. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Ceawlin" succeeded to the kingdom of Wessex in 560.

War with Kent

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Ceawlin and Cutha" fought against "Æthelberht" [King of Kent] in 568 and "drove him into Kent", and "slew two princes Oslaf and Cnebba at Wibbandun".

War with Britons

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Cuthwine and Ceawlin" fought against "the Britons" in 577 and "slew three kings, Coinmail, Condidan and Farinmail" at "Dyrham", and captured "three cities Gloucester, Cirencester and Bath".

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Ceawlin and Cutha" fought against "the Britons" in 584 at "Fethanleag", where Cutha was killed, and captured "many villages and countless booty". Stenton suggests that this place was near Stoke Lyne in north Oxfordshire, and that Ceawlin was defeated in the battle, based on the Chronicle stating that he "departed in anger to his own [territories]", as well as the lack of records of any further advance during his reign.

Accession of South Saxons (Sussex)

Roger of Wendover records the death of "Cissa rege australium Saxonum" in 590, adding that "regem occidentalium Saxonum Ceaulinum" acquired his kingdom. Bede names "Caelin rex Occidentalium Saxonum" as second of the kings who had authority over the southern provinces, south of the river Humber. Presumably this is based on his victories as reported in the Chronicle, although the reports do not suggest that his authority extended so far north in England. Whatever the truth of the matter, King Ceawlin suffered reverses towards the end of his life as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records in 592 that "there was great slaughter at Adam’s Grave" [in Alton Priors] and "Ceawlin was expelled", although it is unclear from the text whether the two events were linked. William of Malmesbury records that he was banished from the kingdom after being defeated at Wodnesbeorh, presumably by Ceol who is recorded in 591 as King of Wessex.

Death

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death in 593 of "Ceawlin and Cwichelm and Crida". Kirby points out that Ceawlin's reign is much shorter according to the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List.

Issue

[Two children:]

a) [CUTHA [III] (-killed in battle Fethanleag 584). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Ceawlin and Cutha" fought against "the Britons" in 584 at "Fethanleag", where Cutha was killed, and captured "many villages and countless booty"[1278]. Florence of Worcester names "Ceaulin rex Occidentalium Saxonum et filius eius Cutha" when recording the same event[1279]. William of Malmesbury also records that King Ceawlin had a son named Cutha "cut off in battle"[1280]. Cutha, son of King Ceawlin, is added in later paragraphs of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle only as the ancestor of later kings, which suggests that the relationship with Ceawlin was added only by the later chroniclers. Cutha was allegedly the ancestor of Cædwalla King of Wessex: The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Cædwalla began to contend for the throne" in 685, adding that he was "son of Cœnberht, son of Cadda, son of Cutha, son of Ceawlin, son of Cynric, son of Cerdic"[1281].]

b) [CUTHWINE . The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Cuthwine and Ceawlin" (no relationship specified between the two) fought against "the Britons" in 577 and "slew three kings, Coinmail, Condidan and Farinmail" at "Dyrham", and captured "three cities Gloucester, Cirencester and Bath"[1282]. Florence of Worcester names "rex Occidentalium Saxonum Ceaulin et filius suus Cuthwine" when recording the same event[1283]. Cuthwine is shown in subsequent paragraphs of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as the ancestor of several later kings, these lines of descent providing examples of the dubious genealogies which link the later kings of Wessex into one family, as discussed in the introduction to this chapter. Cuthwine was allegedly the father of Cynegils King of Wessex: the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, under 688, outlining the descent of King Ine, says that "Cynegils" was the son of "Cuthwine, the son of Ceawlin, the son of Cynric"[1284]. However, this is contradicted by an earlier paragraph in the chronicle which states that Ceol King of Wessex was Cynegils’s ancestor: an addition in manuscript A of the Chronicle, under 611 notes that "that Cynegils was the son of Ceol, the son of Cutha, the son of Cynric"[1285], although it is not clear whether this was contemporary with the main part of the paragraph or a later addition. Cuthwine was allegedly also the ancestor both of ætheling Oswald (the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names Cuthwine as son of Ceawlin, but only in a later passage which records the ancestry of ætheling Oswald[1286]) and of Ine King of Wessex (manuscript A of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Ine succeeded to the kingdom of Wessex" in 688 and ruled thirty-seven years, adding that he was "the son of Cenred, son of Ceolwald…brother of Cynegils…sons of Cuthwine, son of Ceawlin, son of Cynric, son of Cerdic"[1287], although according to William of Malmesbury King Ine descended from Cuthbald, supposedly brother of King Cynegils[1288]).][1]

Sources

  1. Charles Cawley. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. Medeival Lands Database. Anglo Saxon and Danish Kings. Ceawlin Accessed July 14, 2018 jhd




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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Ceawlin by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree:

Have you taken a DNA test for genealogy? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.



Collaboration

On 1 Oct 2018 at 10:18 GMT Jack Day wrote:

Wessex-417 and Wessex-25 appear to represent the same person because: No information has been found for Wessex-417, suggesting his non-existence. It may well be that his names is a mis-print for the name of Wessex-25. A merge with Wessex-25 would thus be appropriate.

On 1 Oct 2018 at 06:59 GMT C. Mackinnon wrote:

Suggest this is a slip of the pen for Ceawlin

On 13 Jul 2017 at 06:57 GMT Emma (McBeth) MacBeath M.Ed MSM wrote:

There is a PPP Unknown Wessex who is set up as Caewlin's wife. It has no biography. I do not know if you want to attach her to this profile or not since she is tagged House of Wessex under the "European Royals and Aristocrats Prior to 742 Project" Thanks!



Ceawlin is 44 degrees from Rosa Parks, 40 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 31 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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