no image

Cynegils Wessex (abt. 0575 - abt. 0643)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Cynegils Wessex
Born about in Wessex, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Son of and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
[spouse(s) unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died about [location unknown]
Profile last modified | Created 6 Aug 2013
This page has been accessed 3,089 times.

Categories: House of Wessex | Ancient Royals and Aristocrats Project | Famous People before 900.

The House of Wessex crest.
Cynegils Wessex is a member of the House of Wessex.
European Aristocracy
Cynegils Wessex was a member of aristocracy in ancient Europe.
Join: European Ancient Royals and Aristocrats Project
Discuss: ancient_euroaristo
Preceded by
Ceolwulf
King of the West Saxons
611 - 643
Succeeded by
Cenwealh

Contents

Biography

Name

Cynegils[1] [2][3]

575 Birth Year Estimation

Having estimated the birth of his son Cwichelm as the year 600, applying the principle of 25 years per generation, Cynegils' birth year would be, say, 575.

Parents and Siblings

The entry for 688 refers to Ceolwald as a brother of Cynegils. [1]

611 Cynegils KIng

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states that in 611, Cynegils succeeded to the government in Wessex, and held it one and thirty winters (to 642). Cynegils, we are told, was the son of Ceol, Ceol of Cutha, Cutha of Cynric. [1]

614 Battle of Beandun

In 614, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "this year Cynegils and Cwichelm fought at Bapton (Beandun)" and killed "two thousand and sixty-five Welsh". [1] [2]

Cynegils is presented in the Anglo Saxon Chronicles as a battle partner of Cwichelm in both 614 and 628. [1] In neither year is the relationship between the two specified, but a father-son battle-partnership is not uncommon.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle refers to the location as Bapton; Cawley as Beandun.[2] Wikipedia suggests possibly Bindon near Axmouth in Devon. [4]

628 Battle of Cirencester

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "Cynegils and Cwichelm" fought against Penda King of Mercia at Cirencester in 628 "and then they came to an agreement". [2] Sarah Zalucki suggests that the Chronicle could be expected to report a victory, but does not, so it is likely that Penda was the victor.[5]

635 Baptism

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle entry for 635 records that Cynegils was baptised by Bishop Birinus, with Oswald of Bernicia as his godfather. [1]

Issue

Under the year 648, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, states that Cuthred was the son of Cwichelm and Cwichelm was the son of Cynegils. [1][2] While subsequent authors have debated the paternity of Cwichelm, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles remain the earliest source, and its account remains the most plausible.

The entry for 676 refers to Centwin as son of Cynegils and King. [1]

Cynegils was the father of:

Since Cwichelm first appears in the Battle of Beandun in the year 614, assume he was of fighting age at the time, therefore born about, say, 600.

Research Notes

Disputed parentage

D. P. Kirby see issues with Cynegils' parentage and thinks there might be two people with the same name. [7]

Disputed Issue

Cawley disagrees with the placement of Cwichelm as Cyngeils' son, stating that "the chronology of the various events described suggest that it is more likely that Cwichelm was probably Cynegils´s brother than his son, assuming that they were related at all. [8]

Note that his parentage is highly ambiguous. Other sources have him as the son of Cuthwine son of Ceawlin.

Cawley reports William of Malmesbury's assertion that Cwichelm was the brother, not son, of Cynegils and also that they ruled jointly. [2]

Cawley notes that the chronology of the various events described suggest that it is more likely that Cwichelm was Cynegils’s brother than his son, assuming that they were related at all. [2]

Wikipedia [6]discusses the issue in terms of Latin terminology, i.e. the use of the Latin term Propinquus (relation, kinsman) rather than nepos (grandson, nephew) in the 648 entry.; however, this has little bearing since the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles were first written in Old English, and only subsequently translated into Latin.

Barbara Yorke accepts that there was a single Cwichelm, and that he was Cynegils' son. D.P. Kirby notes that the evidence is weak, confused, and shows signs of later changes to the record.[9]The evidence that Cwichelm was king of the Gewisse is unassailable, but the question of his ancestry and relationship to Cynegils, if any, is much less certain.[6]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 The Anglo Saxon Chronicle, ordered by King Alfred the Great, 890. Translated by Rev. James Ingram, London, 1823. Everyman Press Edition, London, 1912.Cynegils Cynegils is named in the entries for 495, 611, 614, 635, 648, 676 and 688. Accessed July 27, 2018|jhd]]
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Charles Cawley. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. Medeival Lands Database. England, Anglo Saxon and Danish Kings Cwichelm, footnote 1333 Accessed July 26, 2018 jhd
  3. FMG's Medieval Lands entry on Cynegils
  4. See Morris, J. (1995) The Age of Arthur ISBN 1-84212-477-3 p.307. Beandun has also been identified with Bampton, Oxfordshire, but evidence is lacking. See Victoria County History of Oxfordshire: Bampton and Weald. Note at Wikipedia: Cwichelm_of_Wessex Accessed July 27, 2018 jhd
  5. Sarah Zaluckyj, Mercia: The Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Central England, pp. 28 & 102. Cited by Wikipedia: Cwichelm_of_Wessex Accessed July 27, 2018 jhd
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Wikipedia: Cwichelm_of_Wessex Accessed July 27, 2018 jhd
  7. D.P.Kirby, 'Problems of Early West Saxon History', English Historical Review, 80 (314), pp. 10-29
  8. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: England, Anglo-Saxon & Danish Kings
  9. Yorke, Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England, pp. 133–136 & 143–144; D.P. Kirby, The Earliest English Kings, p. 51ff. Cited by Wikipedia: Cwichelm_of_Wessex Accessed July 27, 2018 jhd

See also:

  • Page 1-2: "King Kynegils, bapt. in the river at Dorchester, Oswald, King of the Northumbrians, being his Godfather. And in 636 Cwichelm (Son of King Kynegils), was baptized at Dorchester."
  • Overton, John Henry. The Church in England, Vol. 1, Page 49-50: King Kynegils, King of Wessex, died in 643. His son: Kenwalch/Cenwalh.


More Genealogy Tools



Sponsored Search




Search
Searching for someone else?
First: Last:

DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Cynegils by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree:

Have you taken a DNA test for genealogy? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.



Collaboration

On 27 Jul 2018 at 14:09 GMT Jack Day wrote:

I added material from Cwichelm's bio but have not researched the references already here or investigated the numerous children currently attached.



Cynegils is 45 degrees from Rosa Parks, 42 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 33 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

W  >  Wessex  >  Cynegils Wessex