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William White (1603 - 1673)

William White
Born in Derbyshire, Englandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married about 1629 [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap
Profile last modified | Created 18 Feb 2011
This page has been accessed 5,416 times.
The Puritan Great Migration.
William White migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Biography

Avoid Mistaken Identity

THIS IS NOT THE MAYFLOWER WILLIAM WHITE. THE CORRECT SPOUSE IS ELIZABETH JACKSON, NOT HANNAH ELIZABETH CADMAN.

William White who died late in 1673 in Boston existed and is well documented in recent studies. Please see below. -- Andrew White, April 2, 2015

Flag of England
William White migrated from England to USA in 1630's.
Flag of USA in 1630's

Immigration

First 3 children born in England, Elisabeth, William & Margaret. Ursula b. 1639 is born in Providence, RI. Thus immigration must be after 1635 and before 1639.

Birth Discussion:

  • 1600‐1610 – Born sometime in these years. Nothing is known about his birth or parentage and no reasonable deductions are possible from the available evidence. Although he is associated with London this does not mean that he was born there – inward migration to London has always been very heavy.
  • 1620s – possibly living in London by this time and associated with the Dutch/English inventor Cornelis Drebbel and his sons‐in‐law the Kuffler brothers.

Marriage:

  • 1629 – Marriage of William White to Elizabeth Jackson at St Gregory by St Paul’s in London. While this is a conjecture it is the best match to the known facts of any marriage record found. Their daughter Elizabeth was married by 1647 which makes a date of 1629 fairly credible. Elizabeth is often mistakenly identified as Elizabeth Cadman which is incorrect – there was an Elizabeth Cadman who married a William White, but at a much later date.
  • 1630s –probably living in London for most of this time. Associated with the antinomian preacher John Everard and the writer Gabriel Plattes. Worked as a furnace maker with many customers among alchemists, brewers, dyers, soap‐makers and other trades using heat. Assisted Everard in alchemical projects. Probably a peripheral member of the “Hartlib Circle” which included Plattes and Robert Child

Births of children – c1630 – Elizabeth c1633 – William c1635 – Margaret c1637 – Ursula c1640 – Susanna c1643 – Isaac

  • 1643 – Mentions of White in Samuel Hartlib’s Ephemerides.

“Mr Whyte Plats special acquaintance <one> that lived for many years with Dr Evered who spent many hundred lb. vpon Chymistry is a most exquisite fellow and the best in England for making all manner of furnaces and of divers other industries.”“Mr White hase amongst <many> other things invented a new kind of Furnaces which will save charges and coales. For hee vndertakes to save one third part of the charges of fire in all Brew‐houses dyers‐Houses and all other Houses and employments where boyling of liquid substances cause the charge.” William White’s Catalogue of Inventions reveals him to have been involved in an exceptionally wide range of activities and to have been actively thinking about involvement in colonization (“plantation”). (Appendix 1).

  • 1645 – emigrated to Massachusetts in the company of Dr Robert Child who had recruited him to work in the New England Iron Works for five shillings a day. Child was subsequently involved in political action against the Massachusetts government and was arrested in mid 1646 – White appears to have had no involvement in this.
  • 7 January 1646 – birth of Cornelius in Boston.
  • 1646‐1648 William White employed at the Saugus Ironworks under Richard Leader. The ironworks were not financially successful and workers were paid in goods (“country pay”) rather than money. He was responsible for discovering the fluxing properties of the rock on the Nahant Peninsula. He argued with Leader who had unfairly (in his opinion) accused him of not living up to his promises. During this period (1647?) White was fined four pounds for selling beer without a license. (Appendix 2). During this time the eldest daughter Elizabeth married the ironworker Benjamin Hearnden who was convicted in court for beating her. She is turn was convicted of stealing a dress from Mary Pray, wife of the ironworker Richard Pray.
  • Early 1648 – lived in Boston where he was employed by the young alchemist Robert Starkey to teach him the secrets of furnace making. White may also have been involved in soap‐making during this period as well as assisting Major John Endicott in setting up a distillery. He was almost certainly associated with John Winthrop Jr and the Bermudian merchant William Berkeley who were both in Boston at this time. There is some reason to believe that White was renting a house in South Boston from Owen Rowe (a member of Cromwell’s government in England and later a “regicide”) and that Edward Rainsford was a near neighbor.
  • 25 June 1648 – William Berkeley wrote to John Winthrop Jr outlining plans to travel to Bermuda to salvage treasure from a sunken Spanish ship.
  • 3 July 1648 – Massachusetts Governor John Winthrop wrote to John Winthrop Jr that “Mr Bartly is going to Sumer Islands [Bermuda] and hath gotten old white to goe with him. he hathe made him so large promises as wee cannot dissuade him from it.” This is a clear reference to White’s leaving for Bermuda with Berkeley.
  • 24 July 1648 – William White wrote to Governor Winthrop outlining his reasons for leaving. (Appendix 3). The letter was written from the ship Return in Boston Harbor shortly before his departure.
  • 8 May 1649 – William White wrote to Robert Child from Bermuda. This letter reveals a good deal about his activities in Massachusetts as well as about his new life in Bermuda. He seems to be in two minds about his decision, accusing Berkeley of letting him down. He is supporting himself and his family by repairing the stills the Bermudians used for making liquor as well as by fishing and gardening. He mentions the mathematician Richard Norwood who was acquainted with Berkeley. The letter also contains some detail about the geology and economic potential of Bermuda suggesting that White had carried out a careful survey.
  • 1651‐ Beginning of the witchcraft trials in Bermuda. Both men and women were tried and hanged. Although there is no direct evidence that the trials affected White or Berkeley, Norwood’s daughter Anne Bowen was one of the first to be tried – she was acquitted. This was a difficult time in Bermuda due to population pressure, lack of natural resources and political and religious divisions.
  • 6 July 1654 – testimony of Margaret White to Governor Wentworth of Bermuda that William Berkeley had raped her. She had been employed as his servant and he had forced himself on her and then asked her not to tell her parents. He had also given Ursula a shilling and attempted to get her onto his bed. Berkeley in his turn accused Elizabeth White of placing a curse on his cattle and William White of saying “the devil take them” which would have had strong overtones of witchcraft in the prevailing climate if any of the cattle had died. (Trials continued throughout this period).
  • 14 February 1655 – William White wrote to John Winthrop Jr from Warwick in Rhode Island. (Appendix 4). He had travelled there in haste from Bermuda leaving some of his possessions with Berkeley who had also asked him to send some alchemical equipment. He had intended to travel directly to be with Winthrop in Pequot (but had underestimated the distance from Rhode Island to Pequot) a clear indication that he intended to work for Winthrop Jr who was planning a major alchemical/industrial enterprise on Fishers Island near New London.
  • 15 February 1655 – Roger Williams of Rhode Island wrote to John Winthrop Jr. He said of William White “It is said that he hath skill in most worcks. Many of ours have thoughts of trying his skill about a new bridge at Providence, and he hath promised to come over to us to consult, but the weather hath hindred.”
  • 26 July 1656 – William White writes to John Winthrop Jr from Fishers Island. The letter reveals that he was making bricks which could have been a precursor to setting up Winthrop Jr’s new settlement. He complains about the lack of help and the slowness of progress. (Appendix 5).
  • 27 October 1656 – at a court session in Providence, Rhode Island it is “ordered yt William White be accomodated with a house Lot adjoining to Benjamin Herndell his house lot and further according to convenience.” (Early Records of Providence, vol 2, 98). The White family had left Fishers Island and moved to Providence where he is granted land next to his son‐in‐law Benjamin Hearnden and daughter Elizabeth, who had moved there in the early 1650s. The land was at Foxes Hill, Pawtuxet. While the family were in Rhode Island Margaret was married to Robert Colwell.
  • 27 April 1658 – at a town meeting 27 April(?) William White is granted a meadow “at the head of Mr Dexters Ground y the little swampe neere Thomas Wallings.” (Early Records of Providence, vol 2, 111). Margaret Colwell was later convicted of adultery with Thomas Walling whom she married after Colwell divorced her. It appears that the town bridge at Weybosset may have been in existence by 1660 which would tie in with Roger Williams’ earlier mention of White’s possible involvement.

Because of his land grants William White continued to be mentioned in Rhode Island records long after he had left the colony.

  • 17 February 1659 (i.e. 1660) ‐ Benjamin Hearnden was brought into court by a bond to answer to "the breach of peace and fright comitted on the family of William White, of this Towne." (Early Records of Providence, vol 15, 75‐76). William White was also bonded to appear at the next town court in Providence to prosecute Hearnden. He did not appear and there is every reason to believe that he had fled Rhode Island with his wife and unmarried daughters in early 1660.
  • 16 October 1662 William White sold his New England land to Benjamin Hearnden for twenty pounds. (Early Records of Providence, vol 4, 9‐11). He is described in this document as a bricklayer of Boston.
  • 21 March 1664 (i.e. 1665) William White bought a house standing on town land for which he was to pay rent to the Town, from Nathaniel Woodward. (Suffolk Deeds, 7:110).
  • 14 March 1669 (i.e. 1670) William White was “granted the land on which his house now stands; N. highway, E. John Ross, W. Capt. Savage, S. upon Sea.” (Boston Town Records 7:53). The house was located on Essex Street, now Beach Street, in Boston and at that time was next to the sea.
  • 13 October 1673 – William White signed his will. It contains some detail about his alchemical and technological activities.

30 December 1673 – inventory taken. White had died at some time in late 1673. Little is known about his activities in Boston. His son Cornelius was a mason who assumed control of his mother’s affairs in 1676 suggesting that he played a supportive role in his parents’ lives. December 1690 – Death of Elizabeth White.

<Hartlib: Mr Whites Inventions.> A CattaLogg of secretts good for a Common welth or plantation 1. As Biulding of stoues stills or any other furnases for the vse of phisitians Chimists and ApotheCaris Cooks hatters & diuers other Tradesmen sauing much fire & also time with the vses of most of them 2. meltinge pots and other vessells for phisicall Cimmicall & goldsmiths & many other trads in Case of wantinge of the ducthmens Wave <& cheaper> 3. also Iugg mettall; that will hold aquafotis as well as glase & will make heads boddys bottls Iuggs etc very nessesarie in all Countrys etc 4. A horisontall Windmill so Contriud: on the topp of a dwellinge house standing <allways> to the winde without tendince: <&> will alsoe doe many things with little tendance 5 alsoe horsemills & handmils with ease added to them a newe way 6 Al<soe> ouens of all sorts portable; good for trauellers by sea or lande or plantations on lately <made> for the Kings vse that will in 24 ours bake bread for a 1000 men: and followe the Army foote for foote: by a frenchman <prised> at ten thousand li. 7 Alsoe making of stous & stills portable: veri nesesarie[altered] for studdys Clossetts etc 8 A newe way by hime Contriued for making or buildinge of salt‐worke to saue much fire & time good for all plantations= & at this time for England 9 Good ways for water works// Good for drye towns or drie or wett grounds 10 A good forte by <hime> soe Contriued that by the turning a horisontall wheele 50 men <may> keep out 2 or 3000= alsoe it is harde to <be> taken <& with> kare works vnder ground & 6 men will Remoue 12 smale ordnace at once & discharge them <all> at one place <if need be> 11 hand granads of Iugg earth against our foraine enemys: not at home 12 A newe deuised ploughe to inCounter with Mr plats setting Enginn 13 Good ways to Calcine & smelt all sorts of oares or mettalls etc 14 A deuise to make the Capp & Coppell or greate test soe that it may saue in walls: by Mr Roberts his Reporte one 1000li a Yeare 15 diuers sorts of bellows for maltinge for nipping vp glasses perfeuminge etc These are enoughe to make some smale showe of Ingnewetie and the are no tricke but all profittable things= and who soeuer doth desire to be further satisfied he may haue any of them moddelled for verry Resonable Consideration= with some Conditions I Could spaike of many more some pleasante & some profitable but it shalbe after I haue a little Collected my selfe and newe Rubbed vp my memorie


The Petition of William White to the Honourable Court of Assistants and Deputys of the General Court at Boston Humbly sheweth that whereas he hath bin by this Court fined the sum of foure pounds for Drawing and selling beere to some few travellers who pass by his house towards Taunton, by virtue of an order lately made by the Court … none should draw it without a license. He humbly Desireth that this fine be taken off, he being a very poore man, not offending willfully, but being a stranger, was totally ignorant of this law, noe notice being given to him by any man, and further his intentions being only to brew a little small beere, for the collyers and other workmen about the Ironworks, which he with much difficulty hath done, being destitute of necessary things for the purpose, without which the workmen would not so comfortably proceed in their workes – and he shall endeavour to shew himself thankful, and always pray for your health and prosperitys. William White The copy of this in the Library of the Massachusetts Historical Society incorrectly dates it as 1645. A more likely date is 1647.

To the Right worshipfull mr. wentrupp Governor of newe Ingland at his house at Boston These presente RIGHT WORSHIPFULL SUR, my humble seruice Remembered first to yourselfe major Endicott mr. Downinge mr. John wentrupe and whosoeuer hath wished my good: with hartie thanks for all your louinge kindnesses, first I desire pardon that I did not personally take my leaue of your worshipe and some other of my good frinds but mr. Rainsford can showe that acidentall hast was the cause, for I lost allsoe 10s that my landlords sonn is to haue of Goodman allen that tooke my house, only for his good will a very vnjust thinge. Goodman beettfeeld tooke the house for me and can certifie that I haue made the house tennantable and saleable that the landlord yeelded for as good as lost. if goodman beettfeeld Recouer it I desire it may be giuen to the poorre: and not giuen to them that need it not: nor hath Right to it. I dessire to give your worship a touch of the Causes of my passage howe first I was promised 5s a day by doctor Child for myselfe and my sonn and 2 Cows and house Rent fre and land for me and all my Chilldren; alsoe Couenants for the same. but the deffered the Couenants and I never had them nor performance: to my great losse: and if you knowe all a greater losse to the cou[ena]ntor. I should haue come over about the tym that mr. John wentrupp cam ouer: if I had the Iron myns of newe ingland had been tryed with less Cost, for I tryed most of the myns in Derbesharre with a bloome harth: I told mr. doctor Child more of the nehaunt myne then I can now spick of. For most parte of the York myns the lye at the day and are partly cutt from there life: and the speritt of feusion and sollidditie is not in them. but the swompe myne is liuing and good. great Riches concer[n]inge whit glass and 2 other things not to be spoken of are within 4 myles of boston: more at large I will write when it shall please god that I write the good news from bermoodos and what I porfitt there you shall suerly knowe: and howe I prosper: it may please god I may se you next springe for there is greate things for me to doe. the second Cause is longe strong winter, 3 Cause, the base dissastor of strong Furnals wife against my poore harmless wiffe: 4thly the Contrie pay is bad to get when a poore man hath earned it that it coms to little or nothing, 5. being none remember all things prevaile against me, 6. I se such hard dealinge with shop keepers both in price waight and measure and the that profese much, and alsoe such sewinge one another in Courts that I thinke loue is wantinge, which is the maine key of Religon for without loue it is nothinge more I haue to say but not at this time. soe with my hartie prayers for this Contre, and the good prechinge and all your healths wealths and prospeties I begg pardon for my boldnes. I leaue your worship and all the rest to the protextion of the allmighti god and Rest your humble seruant to comand WILLIAM WHITE from aboard the Returne this 24 July or 5 month 1648

Right Worshipfull Sirr I most humbly salute you : your wife & family. I am thorough Gods mercie come to new england : with full intent to live near you = when this ship was at bermudos ? said she were bound for Rod yland = I thinking peaquot had not been above 10 or 12 myles of I made more than ordinarie hast to come with them thinking I should have got to you : but we mistook a landmark & fell behind Long island & was 3 weeks = & a week at Rod Yland & a week at Warweek & so be means of some that had heard of me & some that knewe me told me it was to near winter : & that peaquott was a savage barren place : & soe perswaded me to sit down there & to get wood in tyme & many told me that they would send up woode = and I offered 12s = to any that would carry my letters = chiefly because Mr Barklay hath written to you earnestly for some smal boltheads which he sayed you can help him to : & what other busines I knowe not : but he was very desyrus to have an answer by this ships Returne = which if She had not been frozen in could not have been = but as yet tis possible he may = Mr Williams hath letters of publike businese to send to peakquott & hath had my letters near 2 months but about 10 days since the were not gon which greaved me very? because Mr berkle his answer conserned me much : for I had left a mill & other goods for hast behynd me : which if I doe his busines he will doe myne = I have written at large of mynes: of pott ashe : of stilling : of bakinge : of stoues for winter = stoues for swetting the sick ? ? : of salt works & baking biskets : & many other things = but I omit some that I will not trust in paper that will be a benifltt to all parts of the world chiefly england : I have known much money spent on it = & could have done it long since but I have brought many things to pass & have been cossened of them but you I dare trust : for I commit you & yours & all busines that tends to the glory of God & good of a common wealth to God’s protection ?? to my power William Whit I will keep my selfe son setled till I hear from you = if you send ? ? downe speedyly it will give him honest comfort : because of coming in Sumer sessone condition ? enough to plant provision if need be = from Warweek this 14 of 12 month 1654

From fishers yland Right Worshipfull Sir We being very glad of quick & safe Returne doe all humbly Remember us unto you = & doe by these give you notice of our proceedings = that weeke you wente the Rambl (?) was sent to Mistick Ilande which by Reason of Cross Wynds was wholly spent = & the next weeke 4 days about the other Rambos (?) = & the other 2 days we Removed the salt housed and Rased (?) it = & in the absens (?) I cleaned & made a brick plan (?) & began to make bricks = much other worke as parting of Rambos (?) ? &? hath been by us all very carfully done we have allsoe fitted our sythes & haye tooles & they have mowed : & we have made this weeke aboute 5 loades of good haye : being sony wather full of oportunities the wante some rye or Wheate to micx? bread tho Indean corn is for choys that by Reason of waste it is certanlye less proffittable for you & them: as soon as bricks is ready I will make a brick oven & for my ? familyl would desire your Worship if you have non to ? to goodman ? to sende me a bushall of wheat meale & I will? him good pay or ells wheat ? of some of his neighbours mr Cob? xxx had your? mill it would save us some journeys & all for some meal xxx other common? I want shoos for my boys chiefly for as the fall on the ? while? helpe to make haye the ? &? [rest of the page is indecipherable] William White As for help to make haye if I mend (?) well we shall need none = unlesse you can send enough that I and my boyes might be wholly employed in making bricks and then I will offer you no? = and when your Worship can get me some constant helpe I make no question but to doe good of brickmaking till ? can be had — I have digged 2 or 3 places on the rock & at last I have found good fresh watter = & the are very glad for the wattering of? & other cattell was somewhat troublesome other things I might speake of but I will trouble you no more at present

Research Notes

William White. [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Birth BET 1600 AND 1610 England[10][11]

Marriage Wife William White. Marriage 19 JAN 1629. St Gregory's by St Paul's, London England. [12]

Death: Exact date of death uncertain. Will was signed October 13, 1673 with Suffolk Probate Office, and Inventory of Estate was provided December 30, 1673. Death occurred between those two dates.[13][14][15]

Event: William White, A Most Exquisite Fellow. Web Address. NOV 2007. http:/mro.massey.ac.nz/handle/10179666[16] File @M561@. "It is said that he hath skill in most worcks> Many of ours have thoughts of trying his skill about a new bridge at Providence, and he hath promised to come over to us to consult, but the weather has hindered.". Roger Williams to J. Winthrop, Jr. 15 FEB 1655. Providence County, Rhode Island, USA.

Residence Purchases home on Essex Street. 21 MAR 1664. Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA. [17][18]


Occupation: On Fishers Island making bricks in preparation for John Winthrop, Jrs. planned settlement. JUL 1656. Fishers Island, Suffolk, New York, USA. [19][20]

Begins working with John Winthrop Jr and William Berkeley of Bermuda on projects. 1648 Boston Suffolk,Massachusetts. [21][22][23]

Mentioned in Samuel Hartlib's Ephemerides. 1643 London, Middlesex, , England. [24]

Leaves for Bermuda. 24 JUL 1648. Boston Harbor, Suffolk, Massachusetts. [25][26][27][28][29][30]

Arrives in New England to begin working on projects with John Winthrop, Jr. 14 FEB 1655. Providence RI. [31][32][33]

Emigration: Works for Robert Child (1645) in New England Ironworks; Richard Leader at Saugus Iron Works (1646-1648); Robt Starkey, Maj John Endicott setting up distillery. 1645 Boston Suffolk,Massachusetts. [34][35]

Died 30 DEC 1673. Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA. Buried Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA.

Further Notes:

Note N11{\rtf1\ansi\ansicpg1252\cocoartf1187\cocoasubrtf390\cocoascreenfonts1{\fonttbl\f0\fswiss\fcharset0 Helvetica;}{\colortbl;\red255\green255\blue255;}\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardirnatural \f0\fs24 \cf0 Hi Andy, \par \par A belated thanks for the material on Dr. Charles via Steve Sandford. I contacted him and he gave me Bruce White,s e-mail address in New Zealand. I have been working with Bruce since. \par \par It turns out that the William White I have been working with is the wrong one.Bruce sent me a copy of a letter that a William White wrote to John Winthrop Jr. from aboard the ship Return in Boston harbor in 1645 while preparing to sail for Bermuda. This William White names his children in letter,the same ones as stated in the will that I have so that seems to be vety good proof that this is the correct William White not the one who came with Philemon Dalton in 1635. \par \par This new William is an inventor, an expert in building furnaces for smelting iron ore, with high reputation for building the same in England and New England. He also delved in alchemy. It is not known who his parents are or where he came from in England, but he apparently came from Fulham in the south part of London when he came to NE. in1645. He left Boston in1649 for Bermuda, staying there untill he moved to Warwick RI.In 1656, and then to Providence and was back in Boston by 1662 of a little before.

Massachusetts state seal
William White was a Massachusettsan.
William White was born about 1603 in England. He married Elizabeth (Unknown) White. He died 30 Oct 1673 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
He migrated from England on the Increase. The Increase left London, England April 1635 with her master, Robert Lea, arriving in Massachusetts Bay.

Birth and Baptism

William White [36]

BIRTH 1603 England

The Great Migration

The Increase left London, England April 1635 with her master, Robert Lea, arriving in Massachusetts Bay.
The following alphabetical roll is from her departure point, not necessarily who landed..

[37]

April 15, 1635

Certificate source not given. 41 Morse Samuel 50, husbandman 42 Morse Elizabeth 48, wife of Samuel 43 Morse Joseph 20, child of Samuel 44 Daniell Elizabeth 2, listed with Morse family 45 Dalton Philemon 45, lynen wevr 46 Dalton Hanna 35, wife of Philemon 47 Dalton Samuel 5 1/2, child of Philemon 48 White William 14 listed below Daltons 49 Marvynn Matthew 35, husbandman 50 Marvyn Elizabeth 31, wife of Matthew 51 Marvyn Elizabeth 31, sister or duplicate 52 Marvyn Matthew 8, child of Matthew 53 Marvyn Marie 6, child of Matthew 54 Marvyn Sara 3, child of Matthew 55 Marvyn Hanna 1/2 , child of Matthew 56 Warner Jo, 20, listed below Marvyns 57 More Issac 13, listed below Marvyns 58 Ireland Samuell 32, carpenter 59 Ireland Marie 30, wife of Samuel 60 Ireland Martha 1 1/2, child of Samuel 61 Buck Wilton 50, Plowrite 62 Buck Robert 18 63 Davies Jo 29, joiner 64 Fleming Abram 40, husbandman 65 Fokar Jo 21, husbandman 66 Parish Thomas 22, clothier 67 Owdie John 14 68 Houghton William 22, butcher 69 Payne William 22, husbandman 70 Payne Anna 40, wife of William 71 Payne William 10, child of William 72 Payne Anna 5, child of William 73 Payne Jo. 3, child of William 74 Payne Daniel 8 wks, child of William 75 Bitton James 27 76 Potter William 25 77 Wood Elizabeth 38 78 Beardes Elizabeth 24 79 Payne Susan 11 80 Gladwell Aymes 16 81 Perce Phobe 18 82 Crosse Henry 20, carpenter 83 Kilborne Thomas 55, husbandman 84 Kilborne Frances 50, wife of Thomas 85 Kilborne Margaret 23, child of Thomas 86 Kilborne Lydia 22, child of Thomas 87 Kilborne Marie 16, child of Thomas 88 Kilborne Francis 12, child of Thomas 89 Kilborne Jo. 10, child of Thomas 90 Roger James 20 91 Nunn Richard 19 92 Barret Thomas 16 93 Hackwell Jo. 18 94 Ayres Symon 48, chirurgion 95 Ayres Dorothy 38, wife of Symon 96 Ayres Marie 15, child of Symon 97 Ayres Thomas 13, child of Symon 98 Ayres Symon 11, child of Symon 99 Ayres Rebecca 9, child of Symon 100 Rawlin Jane 30 101 Stone Symon, 50, husbandman 102 Stone Joan 38, wife of Symon 103 Stone Francis 16, child of Symon 104 Stone Anna 11, child of Symon 105 Stone Symon 4, child of Symon 106 Stone Marie 3, child of Symon 107 Stone Jo. 1 mo, child of Symon 108 Ayres Christian 7, child of Symon 109 Ayres Anna 5, child of Symon 110 Ayres Benjamin 3, child of Symon 111 Ayres Sara 3 mos, child of Symon 112 Upson Stephen 23, lawyer/sawyer 113 Wyndell/Myndell Jo 16 114 Worden Issac 18, Stone servant 115 Wood Nathaniel 12, Stone servant 116 Streaton Eliabeth 19, Stone servant 117 Toller Mary 16, Stone servant

Increase sources: Hotten P of Q pg 55,57,58,60,61,64-66 http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/increase1635.shtml http://www.winthropsociety.org/ships/increase.htm http://www.allcensus.com/original_lists_051.htm http://english-america.com/spls/635ne011.html#Increase http://www.calaisalumni.org/Maine/ships.htm#Increase

Acknowledgment that the work,

research and compilation was done by Anne Stevens of (packrat-pro.com)

Family

William White [38]

mentioned in the record of Cornelius White Name William White gender Male Wife Elizabeth Son Cornelius White Other information in the record of Cornelius White from Massachusetts Births and Christenings Name Cornelius White Gender Male Birth Date 07 Jan 1646 Birthplace BOSTON,SUFFOLK,MASSACHUSETTS Father's Name William White Mother's Name Elizabeth

Death and Burial

William White [39]

DEATH 30 Oct 1673 (aged 69–70)

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA BURIAL Body lost or destroyed MEMORIAL ID 65050352 A bricklayer, William worked at the Iron Works in Lynn MA for a time, but his work took him to other areas of New England. In Feb 1655 he was residing in Warwick, Kent Co RI and on 17 Oct 1656, he was granted a house lot adjoining his son-in-law "...Benjamine Herndell". In Feb 1657, he was granted a share for his "meddow" near another son-in-law, Thomas Walling [aka Wallen].

On 17 Feb 1659, son-in-law Benjamin was involved with authorities for his "...breach of peace and fright, Comitted on the family of william white, of this Towne." About 1665, William's daughter, Mrs Margaret Colwell, ran away with her married neighbor Thomas Walling [aka Wallen], whom she later married.
By Oct 1662, William had settled again in Boston, buying a house from Nathaniel Woodward. [Suffolk Deeds, 7:110] The house was located on land belonging to the town, which required William to pay rent until the land was granted ownership to him in Mar 1669/70.
In William's Will, written 13 Oct 1673 and proved 31 Jan 1674, he left to his wife and children:

"...all my vissable estate so long as she was a widowe and to have her thirds if she remarried; two Sonnes Isaacke & Cornelius White; two sonnes & 1 daughter Susanna Waggett, wife of Thomas Waggett after the decease of wife; to son William White 5 shillings... to other 3 daughters, Elyzabeth Harnden, wife of Benjamyne... Margaret Wallen, wife of Thomas Wallen, and Usrulla Bennett, the wife of John Bennett each 4 shillings."

In Dec 1676, the widow Elizabeth White signed a document in Suffolk Co MA:

"Elizabeth White of Boston, relict of William White late of Boston, deeded for love etc. to her Son Cornelius White that part of land which his father (bequeathed to him) excepting the house wherein I dwell which is his after my decease and which I reserve to my Selfe during my life."

Sons of the American Revolution:

Name: William White SAR Membership: 11272 Death Date: 1673 Death Place: England, Boston, Massachusetts Spouse: Elizabeth White Children: Cornelius White

Will (Suffolk Co MA PR 7:343)

The American Genealogist, Vol. 62 p. 198 The American Genealogist, Vol. 73 p. 96 (this issue corrected name from Benjamin White to William White).

NOTE: This William White is NOT connected to the Mayflower and Elizabeth Cadman.

Research Notes

Full text of "Ancestral chronological record of the William White family from 1607 to 1608-1895"

[1]

Sources

  1. Source: #S55 Database online. Record for Elizabeth Jackson
  2. Source: #S267 Volume: 57; SAR Membership Number: 11272 File @M294@
  3. Source: #S287 London Metropolitan Archives, St Gregory by St Paul, Composite register: baptisms 1627 - 1651/2, marriages 1627 - 1635/6, burials 1627 - 1659/60, P69/GRE/A/01/MS010232, P69/GRE/A/002/MS10232
  4. Source: #S113 http://hdl.handle.net/10179/666 http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/174582307X237065 "A most exquisite fellow" — William White and an Atlantic world perspective on the seventeenth-century chymical furnaceWhite, Bruce; Woodward, Walter W.
  5. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  6. Source: #S279
  7. Source: #S114 /Users/andrewwhite/Documents/William White/Timeline of William White.pdf File @M556@
  8. Source: #S379 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M626@ File @M632@ File @M556@
  9. Source: #S378 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M611@ File @M617@ File @M556@
  10. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  11. Source: #S279
  12. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  13. Source: #S279
  14. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  15. Source: #S267 Volume: 57; SAR Membership Number: 11272 File @M294@
  16. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  17. Source: #S379 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M626@ File @M632@ File @M556@
  18. Source: #S378 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M611@ File @M617@ File @M556@
  19. Source: #S114 /Users/andrewwhite/Documents/William White/Timeline of William White.pdf File @M556@
  20. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  21. Source: #S379 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M626@ File @M632@ File @M556@
  22. Source: #S378 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M611@ File @M617@ File @M556@
  23. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  24. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  25. Source: #S379 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M626@ File @M632@ File @M556@
  26. Source: #S378 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M611@ File @M617@ File @M556@
  27. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  28. Source: #S113 http://hdl.handle.net/10179/666 http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/174582307X237065 "A most exquisite fellow" — William White and an Atlantic world perspective on the seventeenth-century chymical furnaceWhite, Bruce; Woodward, Walter W.
  29. Source: #S114 /Users/andrewwhite/Documents/William White/Timeline of William White.pdf File @M556@
  30. Source: #S287 London Metropolitan Archives, St Gregory by St Paul, Composite register: baptisms 1627 - 1651/2, marriages 1627 - 1635/6, burials 1627 - 1659/60, P69/GRE/A/01/MS010232, P69/GRE/A/002/MS10232
  31. Source: #S379 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M626@ File @M632@ File @M556@
  32. Source: #S378 Transcription onto index cards of wills and deeds of early Boston William White granted the land on which his house now stands . . . on Essex Street. Named are wife Elizabeth, children Isaac, Cornelius, William, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Ursula File @M611@ File @M617@ File @M556@
  33. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  34. Source: #S113 Details of William's Immigration in 1645 and employment to his death in 1673 "A Most Exquisite Fellow" -- William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth-Century Chymical Furnace, Bruce D. White and Walter W. Woodward File @M561@
  35. Source: #S114 /Users/andrewwhite/Documents/William White/Timeline of William White.pdf File @M556@
  36. William White MEMORIAL ID 65050352
  37. 48 White William
  38. "Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-1915,"
  39. "England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991,"
  • Thwing Index p 18659. Boston, MA: Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630-1822 (Thwing Collection). Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630–1800 and The Crooked and Narrow Streets of Boston, 1630–1822. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.).
  • Thwing p 18660. Boston, MA: Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630-1822 (Thwing Collection). Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630–1800 and The Crooked and Narrow Streets of Boston, 1630–1822. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.).
  • Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.pdf. George Starkey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. William taught furnace making to the young George Starkey in Boston.
  • Hartley, E.N. Ironworks on the Saugus: The Lynn and Braintree Ventures of the Company of Undertakers of the Ironworks in New England. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 1957.
  • Holman, Winifred Lovering. The William White Descent. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1946.

Newman, William R, and Lawrence Principe. Alchemy Tried in the Fire: Starkey, Boyle, and the Fate of Helmontian Chymistry. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

  • White, B.D., and W. W. Woodward. "" A Most Exquisite Fellow"—William White and an Atlantic World Perspective on the Seventeenth‐Century Chymical Furnace." Ambix 54, no. 3 (2007): 285‐98. Available from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/666
  • Will of William White
  • "William White: A Most Exquisite Fellow", Bruce D. White, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand and Walter W. Woodward, University of Connecticut, 2007.
  • Source: S113 White, Bruce D, Massey University Online Home NOTEWhite, Bruce D, Genealogist, Professor, Descendant, Walter H Woodward. Massey University Online Home. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/666 http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/174582307X237065  : 2007. Correctly identifies William White, ca 1600-1610 to 1673, husband of Elizabeth Jackson, father of Cornelius White I, et al
  • Source: S267 Ancestry.com U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2011;
  • Source: S279 Ancestry.com Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2012;
  • Source: S287 Ancestry.com London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812 Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010;
See Also:
  • MediaUS Sons of the American Revolution Membership App-1.jpg. U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970. 11814, 5:48:41 PM. Volume: 57; SAR Membership Number: 11272.
  • Wm White to John Winthrop 1(1).jpg. Wm White to John Winthrop 1. 7211648 William writes to John Winthrop, Jr. about his leaving for Bermuda to work with William Berkeley. John Davis MSS, 1.29 Collections, IV. 198-200. Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • mro.massey.ac.nz/handle/10179/666
  • William White, an alchemist was associated with noted European alchemists and John Winthrop, Jr.
  • "William White: A Timeline", Bruce D. White
  • Source: S378 The Thwing Collection
  • Source: S379 The Thwing Collection
  • Source: S55 Ancestry.com Public Member Trees Publication: Name: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;; Repository: #R1 NOTESource Medium: (null)
  • Repository: R1 www.ancestry.com
  • "Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-1915," database, FamilySearch [2]: 10 February 2018), William White in entry for Cornelius White, 07 Jan 1646; citing BOSTON,SUFFOLK,MASSACHUSETTS, ; FHL microfilm 397,042.
  • "England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991," database, FamilySearch [3] : 8 March 2018), William White in entry for Elizabeth White, burial 30 Oct 1637; citing Penn, Buckingham, England, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 1,999,460.



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Comments: 11

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PMs: are all the @ signs needed throughout this profile?
posted by S (Hill) Willson
You mean the @M123's? No they could be cleared out. But the whole narrative needs a rework.
posted by Jillaine Smith
I can't figure out what the source is for the detailed chronology from 1643-1658 in this profile - there is a lot of great material there but it is unclear where it came from. Does anyone know?
posted by Scott McClain
Update 28 June 2020: This marriage entry is indexed by https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKGY-ZVM

19 Jan 1629 marriage was by license from the Vicar General (see https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Marriage_Allegations,_Bonds_and_Licences_in_England_and_Wales) William White to Elizabeth Jackson. St Gregory by St Paul, City of London, London, England View the actual page by subscription at: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1624/31281_a101656-00057?pid=7075599

posted by Beryl Meehan
edited by Beryl Meehan
Links to Ancestry.com do not work for sources as you need a personal login to gain access.
posted by Gerald Jones
Another William White Marriage Date: 20 Jun 1624 Marriage by banns Place: St Martin, West Drayton, Hillingdon, Middlesex, England

Spouse: Elizabeth indexed as Furake (maybe Ffeacke as hard to read the handwriting) Register Type: Bishop's Transcript https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1624/31547_213878-00025?pid=10619649

posted by Beryl Meehan
Some William White married Elizabeth Hooke by license 7 Nov 1622 St Saviour Southwark (south London area), Surrey, England

by subscription https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1624/48220_263021009500_3388-00099?pid=160756265

posted by Beryl Meehan
White-50715 and White-1947 appear to represent the same person because: same name, spouse in process of merge, this is a multi-generational merge of duplicate profiles. Thank you for reviewing, Teresa (WikiTree Arborist)
posted by Teresa Downey
White-31625 and White-1947 appear to represent the same person because: same wife and daughter, same death, no source provided on -91625 to support birth year
posted by Robin Lee
Elizabeth Cadman was not the spouse of William White. The correct spouse is Elizabeth Jackson.
posted by Andrew White
White-28316 and White-1947 appear to represent the same person because: Same death, same daughter. Other details are consistent (but there are a lot of guesses here).
posted by Ellen Smith