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Samuel Willard (1639 - 1707)

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Reverend Samuel Willard
Born in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusettsmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Groton, Middlesex, Massachusettsmap
Husband of — married about [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Baymap
Willard-225 created 7 Jul 2011 | Last modified
This page has been accessed 874 times.

Contents

Biography

On July 30, 2013 Jana Rains wrote [with minor edits]: ""Reverend Samuel Willard (January 31, 1640 – September 12, 1707) was a Colonial clergyman. He was born in Concord, Massachusetts; graduated at Harvard in 1659; and was minister at Groton, Massachusetts from 1663 to 1676, whence he was driven by the Indians during King Philip's War. The Reverend Willard was pastor of the Third Church, Boston, from 1678 until his death. He strenuously opposed the witchcraft trials, and served as acting president of Harvard from 1701. The Reverend Willard published many sermons; a folio volume entitled A Compleat Body of Divinity was published posthumously in 1726.

Willard's parents were merchant Simon Willard and Mary Sharpe, who had emigrated from England to New England in 1634, settling first in Cambridge. In 1635, with Rev. Peter Bulkley, they helped establish the town of Concord, Massachusetts, where Samuel was born the sixth child and second son. After the death of his mother, his father remarried twice, and Samuel was one of seventeen children born to the family.

At the age of fifteen, Willard entered Harvard College in 1655, graduating in 1659, and was the only member of his class to receive an M.A.

In 1663, Willard began preaching in Groton, Massachusetts, then at the very frontier of the Massachusetts colony, about 47 miles northwest of Boston. The town's first minister, John Miller, had become ill, and when he died, the congregation asked Willard to stay, and he was officially ordained by them in 1664.

On August 8, 1664, Willard married Abigail Sherman of Watertown, MA. In 1670 he became a freeman, with full privileges of citizenship.

In 1671, a 16-year-old girl in town, Elizabeth Knapp, fell ill and appeared to be possessed. Willard wrote about the strange behavior.

Groton was burned on March 10, 1676, during King Philip's War, and the 300 residents abandoned the town. Willard and his family removed to Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Willard preached at Boston's Third Church during the illness of Rev. Thomas Thacher and gave an election-day sermon on June 5. The Third Church called Willard to be its Teacher, an associate pastor, on April 10, 1678. When Thacher died on October 15, Willard became their only pastor. Members of the congregation included a variety of influential members of the colony: John Hull, Samuel Sewall, Edward Rawson, Thomas Brattle, Joshua Scottow, Hezekiah Usher, and Capt. John Alden (the son of John and Priscilla Alden of Plymouth). His wife Abigail died sometime in the first half of 1679; in July of that year he married Eunice Tyng, a possible sister-in-law of Joseph Dudley.

Willard was the acting president of Harvard, although having the nominal title of vice-president, from 1701 until his death in 1707.

4. Rev. Samuel 2 Willard (Simon 1 ), born at Concord January 31, 1639-1640; married first, August 8, 1664, Abigail, daughter of Rev. John and Mary (Launce) Sherman, of Watertown, born February 3, 1647, by whom he had six children. She died and he married second, about the year 1679, Eunice, daughter of Edward and Mary Tyng, born at Boston March 8, 1655, died January 14, 1720.


Birth

January 31, 1640
Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States

Death

September 12, 1707 at age 67
Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States

Place of Burial

Granary Burial Ground, Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA

Immediate Family

Son of Major Simon Willard and Mary Sharpe
Husband of Abigail Sherman and Eunice Tyng
Brother of:
Mary Edmunds
Elizabeth infant Willard
Josiah Willard Sr.
Elizabeth Blood
Dorothy Willard infant 1638
Simeon Willard
Sarah Willard
Joseph Willard and
Abovehope Willard
Half brother of
Mary Stevens
Henry Willard I
Daniel Willard
Hope Willard
Captain Benjamin Willard Sr.
Jonathan Willard
Hannah Brintnall and
John Willard
Father of:
Major John Willard
Abigail (Willard) Treat
Samuel Willard, died young
Mary Melville
Elizabeth Willard
Simon Willard
Edward Willard July 6, 1680 - September 18, 1690
Judge Josiah Willard June 21, 1681 - December 6, 1756
Eunice Willard infant
Richard Willard
William Willard February 1686 - 1717
Margaret Willard
Hannah Willard December 3, 1687 - April 12, 1715
Sarah Willard June 10, 1697 - July 23, 1697
Eunice Willard June 16, 1695 - July 26, 1751
Richard Willard September 1699 - August 1717


Husband: Samuel Willard
Wife: Abigale Sherman
Child: Simon Willard
Child: Richard Willard
Child: Sarah Willard
Child: Eunice Willard
Child: Hannah Willard
Child: William Willard
Child: Josiah Willard
Child: Edward Willard
Child: Samuel Willard
Child: Josiah Willard
Marriage:
Date: 08 AUG 1664
Place: Groton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA[1]

Sources

  1. Source: #S6
  • Source: S6 Author: Ancestry.com Title: Public Member Trees Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006; Repository: #R1


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Collaboration

On 10 Apr 2016 at 13:44 GMT Magnus Sälgö wrote:

.

On 30 Jul 2013 at 20:04 GMT Jana Rains wrote:

Reverend Samuel Willard (January 31, 1640 – September 12, 1707) was a Colonial clergyman. He was born in Concord, Massachusetts; graduated at Harvard in 1659; and was minister at Groton from 1663 to 1676, whence he was driven by the Indians during King Philip's War. The Reverend Willard was pastor of the Third Church, Boston, from 1678 until his death. He strenuously opposed the witchcraft trials, and served as acting president of Harvard from 1701. The Reverend Willard published many sermons; a folio volume entitled A Compleat Body of Divinity was published posthumously in 1726.

Willard's parents were merchant Simon Willard and Mary Sharpe, who had emigrated from England to New England in 1634, settling first in Cambridge. In 1635, with Rev. Peter Bulkley, they helped establish the town of Concord, Massachusetts, where Samuel was born the sixth child and second son. After the death of his mother, his father remarried twice, and Samuel was one of seventeen children born to the family.

At the age of fifteen, Willard entered Harvard College in 1655, graduating in 1659, and was the only member of his class to receive an M.A.

In 1663, Willard began preaching in Groton, Massachusetts, then at the very frontier of the Massachusetts colony. The town's first minister, John Miller, had become ill, and when he died, the congregation asked Willard to stay, and he was officially ordained by them in 1664.

On August 8, 1664, Willard married Abigail Sherman of Watertown, MA, and in 1670 he became a freeman, with full privileges of citizenship.

In 1671, a 16-year-old girl in town, Elizabeth Knapp, fell ill and appeared to be possessed. Willard wrote about the strange behavior.

Groton was destroyed on March 10, 1676, during King Philip's War, and the 300 residents abandoned the town. Willard and his family removed to Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Willard preached at Boston's Third Church during the illness of Rev. Thomas Thacher and gave an election-day sermon on June 5. The Third Church called Willard to be its Teacher, an associate pastor, on April 10, 1678. When Thacher died on October 15, Willard became their only pastor. Members of the congregation included a variety of influential members of the colony: John Hull, Samuel Sewall, Edward Rawson, Thomas Brattle, Joshua Scottow, Hezekiah Usher, and Capt. John Alden (the son of John and Priscilla Alden of Plymouth). His wife Abigail died sometime in the first half of 1679; in July of that year he married Eunice Tyng, a possible sister-in-law of Joseph Dudley.

Willard was the acting president of Harvard, although having the nominal title of vice-president, from 1701 until his death in 1707.

On 30 Jul 2013 at 19:50 GMT Jana Rains wrote:

Place of Burial: Granary Burial Ground, Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA

Birth: January 31, 1640 Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States

Death: September 12, 1707 (67) Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States

Immediate Family:

Son of Major Simon Willard and Mary Willard

Husband of Abigail Willard and Eunice Tyng

Father of: Major John Willard; Abgail Treat (Willard); Samuel Willard died young Mary Melville; Elizabeth Willard; Simon Willard; Edward Willard; Judge Josiah Willard; Eunice Willard infant; Richard Willard; William Willard; Margaret Willard; Hannah Willard; Sarah Willard; Eunice Willard; Richard Willard

Brother of Mary Edmunds; Elizabeth infant Willard; Josiah Willard Sr.; Elizabeth Blood; Dorothy Willard infant 1638; Simeon Willard; Sarah Willard; Joseph Willard and Abovehope Willard «  Half brother of Mary Stevens; Henry Willard I; Daniel Willard; Hope Willard; Captain Benjamin Willard Sr.-; Jonathan Willard; Hannah Brintnall and John Willard




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