Thomas Woodrow Wilson

Thomas Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
President Thomas Woodrow (Woodrow) Wilson
Born in Staunton, Virginia, United States of Americamap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Savanah, Georgiamap
Husband of — married in Washington, D.C.map
Descendants descendants
Died in Washington, D.C., United States of Americamap
Wilson-7591 created 20 Dec 2011 | Last modified
This page has been accessed 5,226 times.

Categories: US Presidents | Staunton, Virginia | Augusta, Georgia | Columbia, South Carolina | Washington National Cathedral, Washington, District of Columbia | Davidson College | Princeton University | University of Virginia | Johns Hopkins University | Democratic Political Party | New Jersey Governors | Lawyers | Capricorn | Nobel Laureates of the 20th Century | Notables.

Notables
Woodrow Wilson is notable.
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The Presidential Seal.
Woodrow Wilson was the President of the United States.
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Discuss: presidents
Preceded by
27th President
William Howard Taft




Preceded by
33rd Governor

John Franklin Fort
Woodrow Wilson
28th President
of the United States
Presidential Seal
1913—1921

34th Governor
of New Jersey
New Jersey
1911—1913
Succeeded by
29th President
Warren G. Harding




Succeeded by
Acting Governor

James Fairman Fielder

Contents

Work in Progress

This profile is being included as part of the WikiTree Presidential Project. Since historical information is readily available documenting the lives of the U.S. Presidents this profile will mainly document genealogically important events in the form of a timeline. Every effort is being made to avoid plagiarism. The US Presidents Users Group is committed to proper documentation of all sources and references. If you would like to learn more about this WikiTree project please visit the US Presidents User Group page.

Presidential Profile Biography

This timeline intermingles dates and events from genealogical, biographical, and historic perspectives.

Time Line

June 6, 1847

Rev. Joseph Ruggles Wilson and Jessie Janet Woodrow were married.[1][2]


October 20, 1850

Marion Morton Wilson, first daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Wilson, was born.[3]


September 8, 1853

Annie Josephine Wilson, a second daughter, was born.[4]


December 28, 1856

Thomas Woodrow Wilson born in Staunton, Virginia to Rev. and Mrs. Wilson>[5][6][7][8]

1857 - 1870

The Wilson Family moves to Augusta, Georgia and resides there. The family takes the Confederate side in the US Civil War. They also are slave owners.[9]


May 15, 1860

Ellen Louise Axson born..[10]


November, 1860 - March 4, 1861

Abraham Lincoln is elected and then inaugurated President of the United States. "After a Republican victory, but before the new administration took office on March 4, 1861, seven slave states declared their secession and joined to form the Confederate States of America."[11]


April 12, 1861

Hostilities begin with Confederate forces firing upon Fort Sumter.[12]


April, 1861 - April, 1865

United States Civil War.[13]


1865

"After the Civil War ends, an eight-year old Wilson watches Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, brought through town in chains on his way to a Union prison."[14]


1867

Ten year old Woodrow Wilson is having difficulty learning to read and develops ways to compensate. If it were the twenty-first century he would probably be diagnosed as dyslexic[15]


July 20, 1867

Joseph Ruggles Wilson, Jr. born.[16]


1870 - 1874

The Wilsons live in Columbia, South Carolina where Rev. Wilson is a Professor at Columbia Theological Seminary. This period in US history is known as "The Reconstruction" and life in the former Confedercy was difficult.[17]


1873 - 1874

Woodrow Wilson "Attends Davidson College in North Carolina"[18][19]


1879

Wilson receives a BA degree from Princeton, University.[20]


1880

Studies law at the University of Virginia.[21]


1881

Admitted to the bar.


June 24, 1885

Ellen Louise Axson and Thomas Woodrow Wilson marry at Rome Georgia.[22][23]


1885-88

Teaches history and political science at Bryn Mawr.[24][25]


April 30, 1886

Daughter Margaret Woodrow Wilson is born.[26][27]


August 28, 1887

Daughter Jessie Woodrow Wilson is born.[28][29]

April 15, 1888

Jessie Janet Woodrow Wilson dies.[30][31]


October 26, 1889

Daughter Eleanor Randolph Wilson is born.[32][33]

May, 1896

Woodrow Wilson, who has had hypertension, suffers his first stroke at age 39.[34][35]


1900 - 1902

Professor of jurisprudence and political economy at Princeton University.[36][37]


1902-1910

President of Princeton University.[38][39]

January 21, 1903

Wilson's father, Rev. Joseph R. Wilson dies.[40][41]


June, 1904

Wilson's second stroke.[42]


May 28, 1906

Wilson's third stroke.[43]



1911-1913

Governor of New Jersey.[44][45]

Summer 1912

Woodrow Wilson is nominated to run for President at the Democratic National Convention after 66 ballots.


March, 1913 - March, 1917

Wilson's first term as president. Significant legislation is passed.


June 28, 1914

In Europe, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria acts as a triggering event for World War I.[46]


August 6, 1914

Ellen Louise Axson Wilson dies.[47][48]


December 18, 1915

Woodrow Wilson marries Edith Bolling Gaft, a widow.[49][50]


March, 1917 - March, 1921

Wilson's second term as president. He ran for re-election on the slogan, "He kept us out of war". It was a narrow victory.[51]


April 6, 1917

"The United States of America declares war on Germany"[52]


November 11, 1918

"At 6 am, Germany signs the Armistice of Compiègne. End of fighting at 11 a.m."[53]


January 18 1919

The Peace Conference opens in Paris. It drafts the Treaty of Versailles between the Allies and Germany, which is to formally end World War I. Wilson attends."[54][55]



1919

Wilson lobbies and pushes for League of Nations. He is unsuccessful. Congress does not approve. Wilson takes to traveling around the country to educate the people about his dream of a League of Nations. This effort saps his strength and leaves him ill.[56]


October 3, 1919

Wilson's fourth stroke leaves him rather paralized. His wife, Edith Wilson, conceals the extent of his disability from everyone and acts for him.[57][58]


March, 1921

Warren Harding is inaugrated as President. The Wilsons move to a home of their own in Washington D.C.


February 3, 1924

Former President Wilson died in Washington, DC.[59][60][61]

Online Sources

Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson

FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson

Britanica

Whitehouse.gov Wilson

Pontus Website

Wilson's Presidential Library

Wilson and the Nobel Peace Prize

Miller Center President Wilson

NNDB dates for TWW's Family

Wikipedia US Civil War

Wikipedia WWI Timeline

Wikipedia for Rev Joseph Wilson

Paris Peace Conference

Wilson's Fourteen Points

WGBH Timeline1 for President Wilson

WGBH Timeline2 for President Wilson

Upstairs at WhiteHouse

PresidentsChildren

Published Source

Roberts, Gary Boyd, Ancestors of American Presidents, Published in Cooperation with the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. Preliminary Edition by Carl Boyer, 3rd, Santa Clarita, California 1989. Also the 2009 edition. Footnote abbreviation: Roberts

Footnotes

  1. Roberts
  2. NNDB
  3. NNDB
  4. NNDB
  5. Roberts
  6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodrow_Wilson Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  7. WhiteHouse.gov Wilson
  8. FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson
  9. Wikipedia Rev Joseph R Wilson
  10. NNDB
  11. Wikipedia US Civil War
  12. Wikipedia US Civil War
  13. Wikipedia US Civil War
  14. WGBH Timeline1
  15. Wikipedia for Woodrow Wilson
  16. NNDB
  17. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  18. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  19. NNDB
  20. NNDB
  21. NNDB
  22. NNDB
  23. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  24. NNDB
  25. Wikipedia for Woodrow Wilson
  26. NNDB
  27. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  28. NNDB
  29. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  30. NNDB
  31. Roberts
  32. NNDB
  33. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  34. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  35. NNDB
  36. NNDB
  37. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  38. NNDB
  39. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  40. NNDB
  41. Roberts
  42. NNDB
  43. NNDB
  44. NNDB
  45. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  46. Wikipedia WWI
  47. NNDB
  48. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  49. NNDB
  50. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  51. WhiteHouse.gov Wilson
  52. Wikipedia WWI
  53. Wikipedia WWI
  54. See Wikipedia Fourteen Points
  55. Wikipedia Paris Peace Conf
  56. FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson
  57. NNDB
  58. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  59. NNDB
  60. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  61. FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson


* End of the Presidential Project profile for Woodrow Wilson.

Additional Sourced Material

  • Note: This material does not easily conform to the Time Lime format, but it was included in the original profile. It seems to be "primary source" material.

Biographical Quotation

A History of Rome and Floyd County: Anecdotes and Reminiscences, p. 290-91. "... Woodrow Wilson was born Dec. 28, 1856, at Staunton, Va., hence was 26 years old in 1882, when Judge George Hillyer, of Atlanta, and others signed his license to practice his profession in that city, shortly before he paid a visit to Rome. Judge Hillyer is authority for the statement that Mr. Wilson first practiced a short time in the Central building, southwest corner of E. Alabama and S. Pryor Streets, and then on Marietta Street near the southeast corner of N. Forsyth, where the Ivan Allen-Marshall Co. office supply store is now located, and in the second story. At this latter place he was in partnership with Edward J. Renick, later assistant secretary of state in President Cleveland's second administration, and still later special legal representative of the banking concern of Coudert Brothers. He had graduated at princeton University in 1879 and in law at the University of Virginia in 1880, and after the usual prelimineries of private study a committee examined him two hours in the Fulton County Superior Court and decided he was well qualified. Attorney Gadsden, of South Carolina, was chairman of the bar committee, and Judge Hillyer was a member of it. ..."

US Federal Census Data

1900 U.S. Census, Mercer County, New Jersey, Princeton township, Princeton borough, Ward 1, 2 June 1900, p. 183B, ED 53, Sheet 3, line 88, 50 Library Place, #63-69: Wilson, WoodrowHeadW M Dec 1856 43 M-15VA OH ENGProfessor of Jurisprudence O-M-H Ellen L.wifeW F May 1860 40 M-15 3-3GA GA GA MargaretdauW F Apr. 1886 15 SGA VA GAat school Jessica W.dauW F Aug. 1887 12 SGA VA GA at school Eleanor R.dauW F Oct. 1889 10 SCT VA GAat school Howe, Ann W.sisterW F Sept. 1853 46 Wd 4-3VA OH ENG AnnenieceW F Mar. 1891 9 SSC SC VAat school GeorgenephewW M Oct. 1876 23 SSC SC VATeacher Bohm, ClaraservantW F Feb. 1848 52 SPrussia P PGoverness immigrated 1898 McLaughlin, AnneservantW F Mar. 1874 26 SNJ IRE IREservant Foley, MargaretservantW F Sept. 1860 39 SNJ IRE IREservant

1910 U.S. Census, Mercer County, New Jersey, Princeton borough, Ward 1, 22 Apr. 1910, p. 19, ED 41, Sheet 11A, line 36, Prospect, [no house or family number given] Wilson, WoodrowHeadM W 53 M1-25VA OH ENGPresident-University R-H Ellen A.wifeF W 49 M1-25GA GA GA 3-3none Margaret W.dauF W 24 SGA VA GAnone Jessie W.dauF W 22 SGA VA GAnone Eleanor R.dauF W 20 SCT VA GAnone Axson, Margaret R.sister-in-law F W 28 SGA GA GAnone Fletcher, Lloyd R.servantM B 37 SVA VA VAbutler-house Shultz, KatherineservantF W 23 SHungary-H-Hmaidimmigrated 1907 Veransy, MaryservantF W 23 SIRE IRE IREwaitress-house immigrated 1904

1920 U.S. Census, District of Columbia, Washington city, Ward 7, 15 Jan 1920, ED 51, Sheet 7A, p. 168, line 12, Pennsylvania Avenue NW, White House, #79-129: Wilson, WoodrowHead-RM W 63 MVA OH ENGPresident-United States Edith B.wifeF W 47 MVA VA VAnone Margaret W.dauF W 38 SGA VA GAnone Wynne, CatherineservantF W 48 S 1905-alIRE IRE IREmaid Nelson, Jennie O.servantF W 46 S 1904-alNOR NOR NORcook Deane?, MarieservantF W 29 S 1904-alENG IRE ENGcook Larsen, SigridservantF W 34 S 1901-nat-1914 SWE SWE SWE cook Caez?, JosephineservantF W 25 S 1911-al___ ITL ITLmaid Jaffary, ElizabethservantF W 47 WdUS ENG ENGhousekeeper

Marriage Of Woodrow Wilson and Miss Ellen L. Axson

Chatham County, Georgia Marriage Book E., page 422: State of Georgia, Chatham County. Marriage License by Hon. Hampton L. Ferrill, Ordinary of the County of Chatham and State aforesaid. To any Minister of the Gospel, Jewish Minister, Judge, or Justice of the Peace of said State: You are hereby authorized to join in the Holy State of Matrimony Mr. Woodrow Wilson of Bryan Maur, Penn. and Miss Ellen L. Axson of Savannah, Ga. According to the Constitution and Laws of the State, for which this shall be your LICENSE. Given under my Hand and Seal of Office this Twenty-Fourth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five. Philip M. Russell, Jr., Clerk Court of Ordinary, Chatham County. This Certifies, That Mr. Woodrow Wilson and Miss Ellen L. Axson were duly Joined in Marriage on the Twenty-fourth day of June A. D. 1885. By me, Rev. I. S. K. Axson.

Marriage Notice: Savannah Morning News, June 25, 1885 Miss Ellie Lou Axson, daughter of the late Rev. Edward Axson, of this city, and Mr. Wilson, son of the Rev. J. R. Wilson, of Wilmington, N.C., were married last evening at the residence of the Rev. I. S. K. Axson, pastor of the Independent Presbyterian Church. The ceremony was performed by the bridegroom's father and the bride's grandfather. The nuptials were celebrated quietly, only the immediate friends and relatives of the contracting parties being present.

MARRIAGE NOTICE: Brent H. Holcomb, Marriage and Death Notices From The Southern Presbyterian, Volume III: 1880-1891 (Columbia, S.C.: SCMAR, 2011), p. 185: Issue of July 9, 1885: Married, in Savannah, Georgia, June 24th, 1885, by the Rev. Dr. I. S. K. Axson, assisted by the Rev. Dr. Joseph R. Wilson, Miss Ellie L. Axson to Mr. Woodrow Wilson. No cards. [This Woodrow Wilson was the future President of the United States.]

Sources


END OF ORIGINAL PROFILE

Additional Biographical Information

additional WWI content from WWI Wikipedia 1919Dates Events:

January 18 1919

Treaty of Versailles between the Allies and Germany: the Peace Conference opens in Paris.

January 25 Proposal to create the League of Nations accepted. Details

June 21 German High Seas Fleet (53 ships) scuttled in Scapa Flow with nine deaths, the last casualties of the war.[56] Details

June 28 Treaty of Versailles signed.[61] Details

July 8 Germany ratifies the Treaty of Versailles.[62] Details

July 21 The United Kingdom ratifies the Treaty of Versailles.[63] xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Some notes from the New Ency.Brit. ?? Is this an online source?? A proper bibliographic entry needed for hard copy sources.

  • The Following was contributed by WikiTree Person Kevin Sands.


1. He had 2 older sisters, Marion & Anne and a younger brother Joseph.

2. The stern Presbyterianism of his father left an indelible impression upon his character.

3. His early years were spent in Georgia and South Carolina where he was deeply affected by the Civil War and the suffering of the South during the postwar.

4. In 1886 he received a PhD at the Johns Hopkins University.

5. He marr. Ellen Axson in 1886.

6. In 1888, he became a professor at Wesleyan University in Connecticut.

7. In 1900, he joined the Princeton faculty as professor of jurisprudence and political economy.

8. In 1902, he was chosen president of Princeton University.

15. In early October 1918, when the Germans faced complete defeat, they turned to W. Wilson to accept his Fourteen Points. The British and French were by no means prepared to accept the peace but the Fourteen Points (with certain exceptions) were accepted by all parties as the basis of a settlement. 16. June 28, 1919 the Versailles Treaty was signed with Germany.


From a different sce:

1880 Studied law at the U. of Virginia.

1881 Admitted to the Bar.


1888-90 Taught history at Wesleyan.

1890-1902 Professor at Princeton.

1902-10 President at Princeton.


1915 Lusitania torpedoed by German submarines - 114 American lives lost. Much anti-German sentiment aroused.

1919 Nobel peace prize.

1921 After an unsuccessful attempt to gain popular support in America for the League of Nations, he fell ill. He left the White House defeated and disillusioned, having failed to attain his dream of a world organization dedicated to maintaining peace.


Biography

This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import.[62] It's a rough draft and needs to be edited.

Death

Death:
Date: 24 MAR 1924
Place: Washington, DC[63]

Occupation

Occupation: President of US (#28)

Education

Education: Princeton, U. of Va. Law School

Note

Note: #N1467

User ID

User ID: F88616AE97A44E3BBFDF3D5FA8D9336054EE

Object

Object:
Format: jpg
File: /Volumes/Data/My Documents/Active Documents/Reunion Documents /Reunion Pictures/Woodrow Thomas Wilson.jpg
Title: Woodrow Thomas Wilson
Type: PHOTO
Primary or Preferred: Y
SIZE 67.000000 100.000000

Data Changed

Data Changed:
Date: 28 JAN 2013

Prior to import, this record was last changed 28 JAN 2013.

Marriage

Husband: Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Wife: @I7086@
Marriage:
Date: 24 JUN 1885
Place: Savannah, GA[64]
User ID: 5450EA44A0C64F1FB31B48C1819D9B3C7276
Child: @I7087@
Child: @I7084@
Child: @I7088@

Sources

  1. Roberts
  2. NNDB
  3. NNDB
  4. NNDB
  5. Roberts
  6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodrow_Wilson Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  7. WhiteHouse.gov Wilson
  8. FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson
  9. Wikipedia Rev Joseph R Wilson
  10. NNDB
  11. Wikipedia US Civil War
  12. Wikipedia US Civil War
  13. Wikipedia US Civil War
  14. WGBH Timeline1
  15. Wikipedia for Woodrow Wilson
  16. NNDB
  17. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  18. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  19. NNDB
  20. NNDB
  21. NNDB
  22. NNDB
  23. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  24. NNDB
  25. Wikipedia for Woodrow Wilson
  26. NNDB
  27. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  28. NNDB
  29. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  30. NNDB
  31. Roberts
  32. NNDB
  33. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  34. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  35. NNDB
  36. NNDB
  37. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  38. NNDB
  39. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  40. NNDB
  41. Roberts
  42. NNDB
  43. NNDB
  44. NNDB
  45. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  46. Wikipedia WWI
  47. NNDB
  48. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  49. NNDB
  50. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  51. WhiteHouse.gov Wilson
  52. Wikipedia WWI
  53. Wikipedia WWI
  54. See Wikipedia Fourteen Points
  55. Wikipedia Paris Peace Conf
  56. FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson
  57. NNDB
  58. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  59. NNDB
  60. Wikipedia Woodrow Wilson
  61. FindAGrave Woodrow Wilson
  62. Wilson-17047 was created by John McVey through the import of Sayre-308.ged on Jan 7, 2014. This comment and citation can be deleted after the biography has been edited and primary sources are included.
  63. Source: #S122
  64. Source: #S122

Notes

Note N1467
From http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/ww28.html:
Like Roosevelt before him, Woodrow Wilson regarded himself as the personal representative of the people. "No one but the President," he said, "seems to be expected ... to look out for the general interests of the country." He developed a program of progressive reform and asserted international leadership in building a new world order. In 1917 he proclaimed American entrance into World War I a crusade to make the world "safe for democracy."
Wilson had seen the frightfulness of war. He was born in Virginia in 1856, the son of a Presbyterian minister who during the Civil War was a pastor in Augusta, Georgia, and during Reconstruction a professor in the charred city of Columbia, South Carolina.
After graduation from Princeton (then the College of New Jersey) and the University of Virginia Law School, Wilson earned his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University and entered upon an academic career. In 1885 he married Ellen Louise Axson.
Wilson advanced rapidly as a conservative young professor of political science and became president of Princeton in 1902.
His growing national reputation led some conservative Democrats to consider him Presidential timber. First they persuaded him to run for Governor of New Jersey in 1910. In the campaign he asserted his independence of the conservatives and of the machine that had nominated him, endorsing a progressive platform, which he pursued as governor.
He was nominated for President at the 1912 Democratic Convention and campaigned on a program called the New Freedom, which stressed individualism and states' rights. In the three-way election he received only 42 percent of the popular vote but an overwhelming electoral vote.
Wilson maneuvered through Congress three major pieces of legislation. The first was a lower tariff, the Underwood Act; attached to the measure was a graduated Federal income tax. The passage of the Federal Reserve Act provided the Nation with the more elastic money supply it badly needed. In 1914 antitrust legislation established a Federal Trade Commission to prohibit unfair business practices.
Another burst of legislation followed in 1916. One new law prohibited child labor; another limited railroad workers to an eight-hour day. By virtue of this legislation and the slogan "he kept us out of war," Wilson narrowly won re-election.
But after the election Wilson concluded that America could not remain neutral in the World War. On April 2,1917, he asked Congress for a declaration of war on Germany.
Massive American effort slowly tipped the balance in favor of the Allies. Wilson went before Congress in January 1918, to enunciate American war aims--the Fourteen Points, the last of which would establish "A general association of nations...affording mutual guarantees of political independence and territorial integrity to great and small states alike."
After the Germans signed the Armistice in November 1918, Wilson went to Paris to try to build an enduring peace. He later presented to the Senate the Versailles Treaty, containing the Covenant of the League of Nations, and asked, "Dare we reject it and break the heart of the world?"
But the election of 1918 had shifted the balance in Congress to the Republicans. By seven votes the Versailles Treaty failed in the Senate.
The President, against the warnings of his doctors, had made a national tour to mobilize public sentiment for the treaty. Exhausted, he suffered a stroke and nearly died. Tenderly nursed by his second wife, Edith Bolling Galt, he lived until 1924.


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Woodrow Wilson 28th US President
Woodrow Wilson 28th US President

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On 15 Jun 2015 at 22:15 GMT Robin Lee wrote:

Please add wikitreepresidents@googlegroups.com to the trusted list for this profile.

On 27 Feb 2014 at 14:00 GMT Maggie N. wrote:

Hello, please let me join the trusted list. Thanks.

Maggie, Project leader US Presidents

On 14 Nov 2013 at 13:28 GMT Cathy Carpentier-Alting wrote:

Could be added to his profile?

On 9 Nov 2013 at 21:50 GMT Philip Smith wrote:

this category can be added

Category: Nobel laureates

On 25 Nov 2012 at 21:28 GMT Kevin Sands wrote:

Hi Becky,

From a different sce:

1880 Studied law at the U. of Virginia. 1881 Admitted to the Bar. 1885-88 Taught history at Bryn Mawr. 1888-90 Taught history at Wesleyan. 1890-1902 Professor at Princeton. 1902-10 President at Princeton. 1911-13 Governor of New Jersey. 1915 Lusitania torpedoed by German submarines - 114 American lives lost. Much anti-German sentiment aroused. 1919 Nobel peace prize. 1921 After an unsuccessful attempt to gain popular support in America for the League of Nations, he fell ill. He left the White House defeated and disillusioned, having failed to attain his dream of a world organization dedicated to maintaining peace.

Regards, Kevin

On 25 Nov 2012 at 19:18 GMT Kevin Sands wrote:

and these...

15. In early October 1918, when the Germans faced complete defeat, they turned to W. Wilson to accept his Fourteen Points. The British and French were by no means prepared to accept the peace but the Fourteen Points (with certain exceptions) were accepted by all parties as the basis of a settlement. 16. June 28, 1919 the Versailles Treaty was signed with Germany.

Regards, Kevin

On 25 Nov 2012 at 19:17 GMT Kevin Sands wrote:

a few more...

9. In Sept. 1910, he was offered the Democratic nomination for the governorship of New jersey. 10. In June 1912, nominated as a Presidential candidate. 11. His first term of presidency was dominated by his efforts to protect the rights of the USA as a neutral in World War 1. 12. In 1916, he was re-elected for his 2nd term as president. 13. On April 2nd, 1917 a Declaration of War against Germany was passed in Congress. 14. On Jan 8th, 1918, he enumerated the Fourteen Points that he regarded as being an essential basis of a just and lasting peace with Germany.

and more...

On 25 Nov 2012 at 19:16 GMT Kevin Sands wrote:

Hi Becky,

Some notes from the New Ency.Brit. 1. He had 2 older sisters, Marion & Anne and a younger brother Joseph. 2. The stern Presbyterianism of his father left an indelible impression upon his character. 3. His early years were spent in Georgia and South Carolina where he was deeply affected by the Civil War and the suffering of the South during the postwar. 4. In 1886 he received a PhD at the Johns Hopkins University. 5. He marr. Ellen Axson in 1886. 6. In 1888, he became a professor at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. 7. In 1900, he joined the Princeton faculty as professor of jurisprudence and political economy. 8. In 1902, he was chosen president of Princeton University.

More to come...



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