Abraham Wing

Abraham Wing (1721 - 1795)

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Abraham Wing
Born in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts Baymap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 1740 [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Queensbury, Warren, New York, United Statesmap
Profile last modified 15 Nov 2019 | Created 12 Mar 2014
This page has been accessed 728 times.

Contents

Biography

Abraham was a Friend (Quaker)

Abraham Wing and his brother Edward were leaders of a group of members of the Society of Friends who first settled the area of Queensbury, New York, in 1762, in what is now known as Warren County.

Birth and Early Life

Abraham was born in Dartmouth, Massachusetts on 26 Nov 1721, the son of Edward and Sarah Wing.[1] He married Anstice Wood about 1741, at Dartmouth.[2][3] He was complained of for marrying out on 24d 12m 1741 [24 Feb 1742]. The matter was resolved when Abraham acknowledged on 15d 1m 1742 [15 Mar 1742].[4]

The birth of their first child, Phebe, was documented at Dartmouth on 22 Feb 1742.[5] Their second child, Sarah, born 7d 12m 1743 [7 Feb 1744], was not.[5] On 10d 5m 1744 [10 Jul 1744], Abraham requested a certificate from the Dartmouth monthly meeting to Oblong, having already removed to live there.[6] In a conveyance dated 6 Jul 1745, Abraham is described as being a tailor at Oblong.[2]

On 1d 3mo 1760 [1 Mar 1760], Abraham and Anstice were documented as being members of the Oblong monthly meeting.[7]

Settlement at Halfway Brook

With the end of the French and Indian War, the northern frontier of New York was once again open to settlement. On 21 Sep 1759, Lieutenant Governor James DeLancey issued a proclamation inviting settlers to three locations which were being vacated by departing soldiers.[8] One location was Halfway Brook in modern Queensbury.[8] As an inducement to settlement, the soldiers wooden huts and coverings would be left behind and settlers would be exempt from quitrent for a number of years.[8] Daniel Prindle, among others, was awarded the patent.[8]

Queensbury Patent
24 Jul 1762

Organizational meetings were held over the summer of 1762 at the Oblong.[9] At one of these meetings, Abraham was voted to be the keeper of the patent for the new township.[9] By August of that year, Abraham had travelled to Halfway Brook with Zacchenus Towner to commence surveying of the land.[10] On Feb 23 1763, William Smith, Nehemiah Merritt, and Abraham were voted trustees to rent out any unoccupied lands.[9]

In 1763, Abraham and Ichabod Merritt arrived at Halfway Brook to begin improvements.[11] It wasn't until 1766 that the first town meeting was held, at which Abraham was elected Supervisor.[12]

On 16d 1mo 1766 [16 Jan 1766], Abraham and his family were granted a certificate from the Oblong monthly meeting to the "Queensbury monthly meeting".[13]

On 19d 3mo 1767, Abraham requested permission from the Nine Partners monthly meeting to perform weekly religious services at Queensbury.[14] Religious services were first held at the Wing residence.[15]

Abandonment and Resettlement

Map of Queensbury
1762 - 1785

The outbreak of the American Revolution caused the abandonment of Queensbury. There is no definitive evidence, but it's reasonable to believe that the Wing family returned to Dutchess County to wait out the war. Resettlement didn't begin until around 1783.

It wasn't until 1785 that a proper meeting house was built.[16] Austin W. Holden wrote in his book, History of Queensbury, NY:[16]

About this time [1785] the first place of worship in town, a log meeting house, was built by the Society of Friends on the south side of Half-way Brook, adjoining the west side of the road leading to Dunham's Bay. (this is currently the corner of Bay and Quaker Roads where the Old Quaker Burying Ground is located). Here too was kept the first school in town, and here was where the first burial ground, where the fathers of the town and their first born rested undisturbed by the shrill cry of the panther, or the nightly long drawn howl of the predatory wolf.

Abraham was one of 36 men who met the property requirement to vote in the 1786 senatorial elections in Queensbury.[17]

Abraham Wing Monument
at the
Quaker Burial Ground

On 10 Dec 1789, Abraham, and many other residents from the township, were discharged from paying all past and future quitrent on account of having to abandon their farms during the war.[18] Abraham is noted for owning 150 acres on original lot number 22.[18]

Abraham died 3d 5m 1795 [3 May 1795] at Queensbury.[2] An abstract of Abraham's will was provided by Austin W. Holden in his book, History of Queensbury, NY:[19]

Wing, Abraham of Queensbury, Wash. Co., last will and testament dated "20 day 9 month" 1794. Give to my wife Anstis the sole use of my house and farm containing about 342 acres and all my stock, farming utensils and household furniture during her natural life. To my son Benjamin and to his heirs, etc., the above homestead with stock, etc., on farm at death of my wife, to my grandson Russell Lewis at mt and his G. mother’s decease, if he shall live with us till that time or when he shall be of age one yoke of oxen and two good cows, to the remainder of my children and G. children, viz: Abraham Winge, Phebe Merritt, Patience Babcock, Content Hixon, Mary Lewis, Grd. children, Joseph, Mary and Deborah Merritt, Richard and Mary Jones, Russell Lewis and Willett Wing all the rest of my estate, viz: 50 acres of land at the meadow, read of first Division lots No 87, 86, 85, 37, 19, 17, and half of 10 and 4, to divide among Abraham, Phebe, Patience, Content, Mary, Joseph, Mary, Deborah, Richard, Mary, Russell and Willett, and if any or either of my Grd. Children should die without a lawful heir, then their share among the survivors. Appoints his wife Anstis exx. And his son Abraham, and friend Elisha Folger exrs. Witness: Warren Ferriss, John A. Ferriss, Reed Ferriss. Proved before the surrogate of Wash. Co., 27 May, 1795, and the same by Abraham Wing, qualified as exr.

Legacy

Abraham Wing School
Glens Falls, New York

The Abraham Wing School in the Glens Falls Common School District is named after him.[20]

Glens Falls was once known as "Wing's Falls" for its Quaker founder, Abraham Wing. Local legend says Wing lost the naming rights in a game of cards with Colonel Johannes Glen in 1788.[21]

As with most Quakers of the period, Abraham's adherence to the tenet of pacifism would have prevented his active participation in the American Revolution.[22] The DAR honors his civil service and patriotic service during the war.[23] Among those services he is remembered for are moderator, treasurer, supervisor, forester, overseer of the poor, commissioner of highways, and overseer of highways.[23]

Children

Children of Abraham and Anstice (Wood) Wing
NameDate of BirthNotes
Phoebe Wing 5d 3m 1742 [5 May 1742][24][2] Alternative date of birth 22 Feb 1742.[5]
Sarah Wing 7d 12m 1743 [7 Feb 1744] [24][2]
Hannah Wing 28d 12m 1745 [28 Feb 1746] [24][2]
Benjamin Wing 29d 9m 1748 [29 Nov 1748][24] Alternative date of birth 18d 9m 1748 [18 Nov 1748].[2]
Deborah Wing 6d 7m 1750 [6 Aug 1750][24][2]
Patience Wing 26d 10m 1751 [26 Dec 1751][24] Alternative date of birth 6d 9m 1751 [6 Nov 1751].[2]
Content Wing 6d 6m 1755 [6 Jun 1755][24] Alternative date of birth 11d 4m 1755 [11 Apr 1755].[2]
Abraham Wing 18d 8m 1757 [18 Aug 1757][24] Alternative date of birth 29d 6m 1757 [29 Jun 1757].[2]
Mary Wing 29d 12m 1760 [29 Dec 1760][24] Alternative date of birth 9d 11m 1760 [9 Nov 1760].[2]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. "Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G979-CWJG?cc=2061550&wc=Q4DC-T32%3A353350701%2C353554501%2C353556701 : 13 July 2016), Bristol > Dartmouth > Births, marriages, deaths 1667-1844 > image 102 of 408; citing Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth, Boston.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 Holden, A. W. (Austin Wells). A History of the Town of Queensbury, In the State of New York: With Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Distinguished Men, And Some Account of the Aborigines of Northern New York. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell, 1874, p 56.
  3. [Monthly meeting records, Men's minutes 1727-1762], Society of Friend, Dartmouth Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends : Dartmouth , Mass.), p. 157.
  4. [Monthly meeting records, Men's minutes 1727-1762], Society of Friend, Dartmouth Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends : Dartmouth , Mass.), p. 158.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L979-CWC2?cc=2061550&wc=Q4DC-T32%3A353350701%2C353554501%2C353556701 : 13 July 2016), Bristol > Dartmouth > Births, marriages, deaths 1667-1844 > image 103 of 408; citing Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth, Boston.
  6. [Monthly meeting records, Men's minutes 1727-1762], Society of Friend, Dartmouth Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends : Dartmouth , Mass.), p. 176.
  7. Monthly meeting records, Vital records: 1745-83, Society of Friend, Oblong Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends : Hicksite : Pawling, N.Y.), p. 229.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p 371
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p 373.
  10. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p 372.
  11. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p 376.
  12. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p 380.
  13. Monthly meeting records, Men's minutes 1757-81, Society of Friend, Oblong Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends : Hicksite : Pawling, N.Y.), p. 180.
  14. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p. 382.
  15. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p. 381.
  16. 16.0 16.1 Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p. 499.
  17. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p. 503-4.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p. 504.
  19. Holden, History of the Town of Queensbury, p. 57.
  20. https://www.abewing.org/
  21. https://www.glensfalls.com/about/glens-falls/
  22. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quakers_in_the_American_Revolution
  23. 23.0 23.1 Daughters of the American Revolution, DAR Genealogical Research Databases, database online, (http://www.dar.org/ : accessed December 25, 2018), "Record of Abraham Wing ", Ancestor # A128551.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 24.5 24.6 24.7 24.8 Monthly meeting records, Vital records: 1745-83, Society of Friend, Oblong Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends : Hicksite : Pawling, N.Y.), p. 5

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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Abraham by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Abraham:

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Abraham is 18 degrees from Danielle Liard, 12 degrees from Jack London and 12 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.