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Goufsen Ginter (1791 - abt. 1852)

Goufsen "Godfrey" Ginter
Born in Germanymap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 1821 in Pennsylvaniamap
Husband of — married 1834 in Huntingdon County Pennsylvaniamap
Husband of — married 1834 in Huntingdon, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, USAmap
Descendants descendants
Died about in Richland Twp Clarion Pennsylvaniamap
Profile last modified | Created 7 Oct 2009 | Last significant change: 1 Jul 2021
11:46: Gill Whitehouse edited the Biography for Goufsen Ginter (1791-abt.1852). (Removed stray ref tags - not needed here.) [Thank Gill for this]
This page has been accessed 233 times.
This profile lacks source information. Please add sources that support the facts.

Contents

Biography

Name

Name: Godfrey /Ginter/
Given Name: Godfrey
Surname: Ginter[1][2][3][4][5]
Name: Godfrey /Kindner/
Given Name: Godfrey
Surname: Kindner

Found multiple versions of NAME. Using Godfrey /Ginter/.

Birth

Birth:
Date: Abt 1791
Place: Germany[6]

Death

Death:
Date: 1852-1860
Place: Richland Twp Clarion Pennsylvania

Imported only 1852 from Death Date and marked as uncertain.

Residence

Residence: Age: 59
Date: 1850
Place: Richland, Clarion, Pennsylvania[7]
Residence:
Date: 1840
Place: Henderson, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, United States[8]
Residence:
Date: 1830
Place: Morris, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, United States[9]
Residence:
Date: 1820
Place: Bethel, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, United States[10]
Residence:
Date: 12 Jul 1835
Place: Huntingdon County Pennsylvania[11][12]
Residence:
Date: Nov 1836
Place: Cambria County Pennsylvania[13][14]
Residence:
Date: 9 Oct 1842
Place: Lebanon County Pennsylvania[15][16]
Residence:
Date: 1844
Place: Clarion County Pennsylvania[17]
Residence:
Date: 1852
Place: Keating's Furnace[18][19]

Immigration

Immigration:
Date: 1820
Place: Bethel Township Lebanon County Pennsylvania[20][21]

Census

Census:
Date: 1 Jun 1830
Place: Morris Twp Huntingdon County Pennsylvania[22][23]
Census:
Date: 1 Jun 1840
Place: Henderson Twp Huntingdon County Pennsylvania[24][25]
Census:
Date: 2 Aug 1850
Place: Richland Twp Clarion County Pennsylvania[26][27]

Event

Event:
Type: Military Service
Date: 1812-1814
Place: Europe[28][29]
Object:
Format: mm
File: rd?f=document&guid=3d4390c5-c6e7-4cd7-a544-4abae60c4872&tid=17676276&pid=2
Title: Military Service
Primary or Preferred: Y
Type: PHOTO
Event: from a wound received during his service as a soldier under Napolean
Type: Illness
Date: 1845 +-5
Place: Emlenton, Venango, Pennsylvania, USA[30][31]
Event:
Type: History
Date: 1812-1814
Place: Europe[32][33]
Event: Morris TWP tax records
Type: Tax List Personal Property
Date: 1831-1834
Place: Morris Twp Huntingdon County Pennsylvania[34][35]

Marriage

Husband: Godfrey Ginter
Wife: Fnk Lnk
Marriage:
Date: Abt 1821
Place: Pennsylvania[36]
Child: Son Ginter
Child: Rebecca J. Ginter
Child: William Ginter
Child: Godfried Ginter
Data Changed:
Date: 20 Aug 2013
Time: 09:36

Research Notes

Note HI2(Research):Church and cemetery records, bible records, 1766-1938 FHL United States & Canada
Film 900626
check Water Street Cemetery, Morris Twp. Huntingdon County PA
Feature Name: Waterstreet Cemetery
Feature Type: cemetery
Description: Located in Morris Township.
State: Pennsylvania
County: Huntingdon
USGS 7.5' x 7.5' Map: Spruce Creek
LAT: 403416N
LON: 0780826W
GINTER, DANIEL ALLEGHANY PA-31-3-154 GINTER, WILLIAM BRADY PA-31-12-1 GINTER, WILLIAM MORRIS PA-31-6-306
Personal Information What to do next?
Name:Godfrey Ghent
Place of Origin:Germany
Declaration of Intent Date:Dec 24, 1816
Declaration of Intent Court:Common Pleas
Oath of Allegiance Date:Oct 10, 1825
Oath of Allegiance Court:Common Pleas
Signature 1:
Signature 2:Godfrey Ghent
Comment:38370
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Philadelphia, 1789-1880 Naturalization Records [database online]. Provo, Utah: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2003. Original data: Filby, P. William, edit. Philadelphia Naturalization Records. Detroit, MI: Gale Research Co., 1982.
"Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen, 1776-1896, Volume II," Published by
H. H. Hardesty, publisher, New York, Toledo and Chicago, 1895; page
1297-1298 (Joseph G. Kellerman); page 1454-1455 (H. E. Ginter).

Sources

  1. Source: #S932 Page: file # 36690 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  2. Source: #S721 Page: 1820 U S Census; Census Place: Bethel, Lebanon, Pennsylvani a; Page: 99; NARA Roll: M33_105; Image: 82 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,7734::888970
  3. Source: #S557 Page: 1830 US Census; Census Place: Morris, Huntingdon, Pennsylva nia; Page: 82; NARA Series: M19; Roll Number: 166; Family H istory Film: 0020640 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8058::603201
  4. Source: #S1260 Page: Year: 1840; Census Place: Henderson, Huntingdon, Pennsylvan ia; Roll: 462; Page: 209; Image: 422; Family History Librar y Film: 0020546 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8057::1805905
  5. Source: #S113 Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: Richland, Clarion, Pennsylvania ; Roll: M432_767; Page: 182A; Image: 369 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8054::418010
  6. Source: #S113 Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: Richland, Clarion, Pennsylvania ; Roll: M432_767; Page: 182A; Image: 369 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8054::418010
  7. Source: #S113 Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: Richland, Clarion, Pennsylvania ; Roll: M432_767; Page: 182A; Image: 369 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8054::418010
  8. Source: #S1260 Page: Year: 1840; Census Place: Henderson, Huntingdon, Pennsylvan ia; Roll: 462; Page: 209; Image: 422; Family History Librar y Film: 0020546 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8057::1805905
  9. Source: #S557 Page: 1830 US Census; Census Place: Morris, Huntingdon, Pennsylva nia; Page: 82; NARA Series: M19; Roll Number: 166; Family H istory Film: 0020640 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,8058::603201
  10. Source: #S721 Page: 1820 U S Census; Census Place: Bethel, Lebanon, Pennsylvani a; Page: 99; NARA Roll: M33_105; Image: 82 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Reference: 1,7734::888970
  11. Source: #S942
  12. Source: #S1470
  13. Source: #S946 Page: Joseph G Kellerman Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  14. Source: #S1471
  15. Source: #S972 Page: Jacob Sterner Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  16. Source: #S1472
  17. Source: #S794 Page: page 1454-1455 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  18. Source: #S946 Page: Joseph G Kellerman Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  19. Source: #S1476
  20. Source: #S1247 Page: page 99 line 2 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  21. Source: #S1468
  22. Source: #S1213 Page: page 82 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  23. Source: #S1362
  24. Source: #S1194 Page: page 209 i# 131 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  25. Source: #S1363
  26. Source: #S1161 Page: Page: 182 Image: 365 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  27. Source: #S1474
  28. Source: #S794 Page: page 1454-1455 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  29. Source: #S1469
  30. Source: #S794 Page: page 1454-1455 Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  31. Source: #S1473
  32. Source: #S823 Page: Wikipedia French invasion of Russia Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  33. Source: #S1477
  34. Source: #S760
  35. Source: #S1478
  36. Source: #S669
  • Source: S113 Abbreviation: 1850 United States Federal Census Title: 1850 United States Federal Census Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Reference: 1,8054::0 Repository: #R2
  • Repository: R2 Name: Ancestry.com Address: Ancestry.com CONT http://www.Ancestry.com Name: Ancestry.com Address 1: http://www.Ancestry.com
  • Source: S1161 Abbreviation: Federal Census Clarion County, Richland Twp 1850 Title: Federal Census Clarion County, Richland Twp 1850 Author: United States Publication: Year: 1850 County: Clarion Township: Richland Twp State: Pennsylvania Roll: M432_767 Page: 182 Image: 365
  • Source: S1194 Abbreviation: 1840 United States Census Title: 1840 United States Census Author: United States Publication: ancestry.com Roll:M704_462 im# 131 page 209
  • Source: S1213 Abbreviation: 1830 United States Census Title: 1830 United States Census Author: United States Publication: Year: 1830; Census Place: Morris, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; Roll: 166; Page: 82.
  • Source: S1247 Abbreviation: 1820 Census Title: 1820 Census Author: Federal Government Note: Godfrey Kindner age 26-45 alien residency
  • Source: S1260 Abbreviation: 1840 United States Federal Census Title: 1840 United States Federal Census Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data - Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. (NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record G Reference: 1,8057::0 Repository: #R2
  • Source: S1362 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: 1 male 20-30, 1 female 20-30, 1 male 5-10, 1 female 5-10, 2 males under 5.
  • Source: S1363 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: 1male 40-49, 1 female 30-39, 1 female 15-19, 1 male 5-9, 1 male under 5, 1 female under 5.
  • Source: S1468 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: 1820 Census Bethel Township Lebanon county PA page 99 line 2 Godfrey Kindner age: 26-45 alien status
  • Source: S1469 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: His (Henry Edward Ginter) father (Godfry Ginter) was in the Russian Campaign and served under Napolean Bonaparte. He was wounded in the arm and leg and thirty years later had to have the leg amputated on the account of his wound. His wife's father served in the same capacity as his father, Comrade Ginter, and was a member of Biddle Post 248. As a historical note, Napolean began his Russian campaign in June of 1812 with 650,000 troops, by Oct of the same year 570,000 were dead.
  • Source: S1470 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: son born Henry Edward.
  • Source: S1471 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: daughter born, Mary Ann born 23 Nov 1836.
  • Source: S1472 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: daughter Rebecca was married in her father's house.
  • Source: S1473 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: leg was amputated due to infection.
  • Source: S1474 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: age 59, miller, born Germany, married to Mary, oo. literate. Note. Daughter rebecca with her husband Jacob Sterner are living near by.
  • Source: S1476 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: Richland Keating & Bencel (Caldwell) John Keating & J. Vensel (History) 1846 Located on a small branch of Turkey Run in Richland Township. Height 30'; 8' bosh. Steam - cold blast. Built by John Keating & J. Vensel. Averaged 550 tons in 1854-1856
  • Source: S1477 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: Napoleon's invasion of Russia The Opposing Armies On June 24 , 1812, the Grande Armâee of 691,501 men, the largest army assembled up to that point in European history, crossed the river Neman and headed towards Moscow . The Grande Armâee was divided as follows: A central strike force of 250,000 under the emperor's personal command. Two other frontline armies under Eugáene de Beauharnais (80,000 men) and Jâerãome Bonaparte (70,000 men). Two detached corps under Jacques MacDonald (32,500 men) and Karl Schwarzenberg (34,000 Austrian troopers). A reserve army of 225,000 troops. In addition 80,000 National Guards had been conscripted for full military service defending the imperial frontier of the Grand Duchy of Warsaw . With these included total French imperial forces on the Russian border and in Russia came to some 771,500 men. This vast commitment of manpower severely strained the Empire - especially considering that there were a further 300,000 French troops fighting in Iberia and over 200,000 more in Germany and Italy. 450,000 French troops made up the majority of the army with French allies making up the rest. In addition to the detached Austrian corps under Schwarzenberg there were some 95,000 Poles, 90,000 Germans (24,000 Bavarians , 20,000 Saxons , 20,000 Prussians , 17,000 Westphalians and several thousand from smaller Rhineland states), 25,000 Italians , 12,000 Swiss , 4,800 Spaniards, 3,500 Croats and 2,000 Portuguese . In addition there were Dutch and also a number of Belgian contingents. In short every nationality in Napoleon's vast empire was represented. According to most modern estimates, the Russian army numbered less than the French initially. Some 280,000 Russian troops were deployed to the Polish frontier (in preparation for Tsar Alexander I 's planned invasion of the French satellite, the Grand Duchy of Warsaw). Total Russian armies numbered about 500,000 (some estimates place the number as low as 350,000, while others go anywhere up to 710,000 - probably a figure in the vicinity of 400,000 is more accurate) on the eve of war. These were divided into three main armies - the First Army of the West (commanded by General Mikhail Barclay de Tolly ) of some 159,800 men, the Second Army of the West (commanded by General Pyotr Bagration ) numbering 62,000, and the Third Army of the West (commanded by General Tormasov) numbering about 58,200. Two reserve forces, one of 65,000 and one of 47,000 supported these three frontline armies. Going by these figures the Russian armies immediately facing Napoleon numbered some 392,000. In addition, peace had been secured for St Petersburg with Sweden and the Ottoman Empire - freeing up over 100,000 more troopers. Efforts were made to swell Russian armies and by September troop numbers had been expanded to around 900,000 - not including irregular cossack units, which probably add a further 70,000 or 80,000 men to the total. The March on Moscow The invasion commenced on June 23 , 1812. Napoleon had sent a final offer of peace to St. Petersburg shortly before commencing operations. He never received a reply, so he gave the order to proceed into Russian Poland. He initially met little resistance and moved quickly into the enemy's territory. Barclay, the Russian commander-in-chief, refused to fight despite Bagration's urgings. Several times he attempted to establish a strong defensive position, but each time the French advance was too quick for him to finish preparations and he was forced to retreat once more. This has often been used as an example of the scorched earth policy. Political pressure on Barclay to give battle and the general's continuing resistance (viewed as intransigence by the populace) led to his removal from the position of commander-in-chief to be replaced by the boastful and popular Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov . Despite Kutuzov's rhetoric to the contrary, he continued in much the way Barclay had, immediately seeing that to face the French in open battle would be to sacrifice his army pointlessly. Finally he managed to establish a defensive position at Borodino following an indecisive clash at Smolensk on August 16 -18 . The Battle of Borodino on September 7 was the bloodiest single day of battle in the Napoleonic Wars , and possibly of recorded human history. The Russian army could only muster half of its strength on September 8 and was forced to retreat, leaving the road to Moscow open. Kutuzov also ordered the evacuation of the city. By this point the Russians had managed to draft large numbers of reinforcements into the army bringing total Russian land forces to their peak strength in 1812 of 904,000 with perhaps 100,000 in the immediate vicinity of Moscow - the remnants of Kutuzov's shattered army from Borodino partially reinforced. The Capture of Moscow Napoleon moved into an empty city that was stripped of all supplies by its governor, Fyodor Rostopchin . Relying on classical rules of warfare aiming at capturing the enemy's capital (even though St. Petersburg had been the actual capital at that time), Napoleon had expected Czar Alexander I to offer his capitulation at the Poklonnaya Hill , but Russian command did not think of surrendering. Instead, fires broke out in Moscow , and raged in the city from 14 to 18 September New Style (2 to 6 September Old Style ). Moscow, constructed mainly of wooden buildings at the time, burnt down almost completely (it was estimated that 4/5ths of the city was destroyed), effectively depriving the French of shelter in the city. It is assumed that the fires were due to Russian sabotage . Subsequently, before leaving Moscow, Napoleon gave orders to have the Kremlin and all public buildings burnt. Additionally, the Grand Army, unhappy with military conditions and no sign of victory, began looting what little remained within Moscow; however during the long retreat most items had to be abandoned. Napoleon would later remark that had he moved out of Moscow a fortnight earlier than he did, he could have destroyed Kutuzov's army encamped at nearby Tarutino . While this would have by no means left Russia defenseless, it would have deprived it of its only concentrated army capable of challenging the French. Sitting in the ashes of a ruined city without having received the Russian capitulation, and facing a Russian maneuver forcing him out of Moscow, Napoleon started his long retreat. At the Battle of Maloyaroslavets , Kutuzov was able to force the French army into using the very same scorched Smolensk road on which they had earlier moved East; continuing to block the southern flank to prevent the French from returning by a different route, Kutuzov again deployed partisan tactics to constantly strike at the French trail where it was weakest. Light Russian cavalry, including mounted Cossacks , assaulted and shattered isolated French units. Supplying the army became an impossibility - the lack of grass weakened the army's remaining horses, almost all of which died or were killed for food by starving soldiers. With no horses the French cavalry ceased to exist, and cavalrymen were forced to march on foot. In addition the lack of horses meant that cannons and wagons had to be abandoned, depriving the army of artillery and support convoys. Although the army was quickly able to replace its artillery in 1813 the abandonment of wagons created an immense logistics problem for the remainder of the war, as thousands of the best military wagons were left behind in Russia. As starvation and disease took their toll the desertion rate soared. Most of the deserters were taken prisoner or promptly executed by Russian peasants. The crossing of the river Berezina brought about another major defeat as Kutuzov, deciding that the time was right for an open battle, attacked and crushed the part of the French army that had not yet made it across the bridge. In early December 1812 Napoleon learned that General Claude de Malet had attempted a coup d'etat back in France . He abandoned the army and returned home on a sleigh, leaving Marshal Joachim Murat in charge. Murat later deserted in order to save his kingdom of Naples , leaving Napoleon's former stepson, Eugene de Beauharnais , in command. In the following weeks, the remnants of the Grand Army were further diminished, and on December 14 , 1812 they were expelled from Russian territory. Only about 22,000 of Napoleon's men survived the Russian campaign. Russian casualties in the few open battles are comparable to the French losses, but civilian losses along the devastated war path were much higher than the military casualties. In total, despite earlier estimates giving figures of several million dead, around one million were killed - fairly evenly split between the French and Russians. Military losses amounted to 300,000 French, 70,000 Poles, 50,000 Italians, 80,000 Germans and perhaps 450,000 Russians. As well as the loss of human life the French also lost some 200,000 horses and over 1,000 artillery pieces.
  • Source: S1478 Abbreviation: Source Title: Source Publication: 1831: 1 cow (on married man's list, added at the end of the list in a differnt hand and ink.) date about Feb 1831 Feb 9, 1832: 1 occupation 1833: 1 occupation 1834: 1 occupation
  • Source: S557 Abbreviation: 1830 United States Federal Census Title: 1830 United States Federal Census Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data - Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Gr Reference: 1,8058::0 Repository: #R2
  • Source: S721 Abbreviation: 1820 United States Federal Census Title: 1820 United States Federal Census Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data - Fourth Census of the United States, 1820. (NARA microfilm publication M33, 142 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record G Reference: 1,7734::0 Repository: #R2
  • Source: S760 Abbreviation: Research by Miss Alberta Y. Haught Title: Research by Miss Alberta Y. Haught Author: Huntingdon County Historical Society
  • Source: S794 Abbreviation: Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen, 1776-1896 Title: Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen, 1776-1896 Author: Published by H. H. Hardesty Publication: Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen, 1776-1896, Volume II, Published by H. H. Hardesty, publisher, New York, Toledo and Chicago, 1895; page 1297-1298 (Joseph G. Kellerman); page 1454-1455 (H. E. Ginter); [Book in possession (2004) of Linda Freer Salgren, grand
  • Source: S823 Abbreviation: Napoleon's invasion of Russia Title: Napoleon's invasion of Russia Author: Wikipedia Publication: "Napoleon's invasion of Russia." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 15 Oct 2006, 02:09 UTC. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.
  • Source: S886 Abbreviation: Huntingdon County Historical Society Title: Huntingdon County Historical Society Author: Alberta Y. Haught Page: two hours research Quality or Certainty of Data: 3
  • Source: S932 Abbreviation: Death certificate PA Dept of Health Title: Death certificate PA Dept of Health
  • Source: S942 Abbreviation: CW Pension Application Henry Edward Ginter Title: CW Pension Application Henry Edward Ginter
  • Source: S946 Abbreviation: Pension File Title: Pension File Author: United States Dept of Interior Pension Office
  • Source: S956 Abbreviation: Ancestry Family Trees Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Repository: #R2 Page: Ancestry Family Tree Quality or Certainty of Data: 3 Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=17676276&pid=2
  • Source: S972 Abbreviation: application for pension for widows civil war Title: application for pension for widows civil war

This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import. Ginter-110 was created by Dianne Snedeker through the import of maryfrancishuber.ged on Nov 8, 2014. This comment and citation can be deleted after the biography has been edited and primary sources are included. It's a rough draft and needs to be edited.




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Ginter-110 and Ginter-5 appear to represent the same person because: Same name, same birth date, same child
posted by Anonymous Langdale

G  >  Ginter  >  Goufsen Ginter

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