Origin of Dennis Pratt, ancestor of the Ligons

+1 vote
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Dennis Pratt, born ca 1577, was an ancestor of the Ligons, and thus ancestor of hundreds of thousands of Americans.

I think I have found his origins. Check out his profile.
WikiTree profile: Dennis Pratt
in The Tree House by Stephen Freeman G2G2 (2.5k points)

1 Answer

+2 votes

I'm sorry Stephen but I have to disagree with some of the points in your argument on the profile (I know nothing about this particular family  so I'm just giving my opinion from general points) I don't think you can equate Richard baptised in 1588 with the unbaptised child buried in 1590. There is still the possibility that the parents of Richard in Repton are the parents of later children in Stoke.

1) The burial of the unbaptised child  clearly took place in May 1590   It appears under the heading of Ann Domini 1590  see  (ignore index entry which will appear  which is for An,  the  sister,  baptised in November 1591)

2) You are equating this  burial with a child baptised as Richard in  November 1588 in Repton.  To me this doesn't seem right.

This child has no name  at burial because he was unbaptised. This was a really important and devastating  thing for a vicar to write and occurs very rarely.  I doubt that the vicar in  May 1590 would contemplate that a child of 18 months would be unbaptised.  Names are given during the  baptism ceremony and  theologically without baptism  there was no  certainty of redemption. An unbaptised child  would normally have been  buried outside the consecrated area of the churchyard. There would be no funeral service and  indeed there are probably  burials of unbaptised infants that go unrecorded.  In this period, to avoid this fate  baptisms took place on the first Sunday or holy day after birth. Sickly babies who were thought to be at risk of dying  were usually  baptised immediately after birth by the midwife or the vicar was called in.  The fear of unbaptised death meant that sometimes babies were  baptised before the  child had been fully born and its sex  known (Creature was one name used for such baptisms)

by Helen Ford G2G6 Pilot (354k points)
Thank you. That is helpful. I checked again and you are correct. I will change that and keep looking. Your correction actually helps my argunment
Thank you. That is helpful. I checked again and you are correct. I will change that and keep looking. Your correction actually helps my argument.
I completely agree with Helen that the 'unbaptized child' cannot be Richard. Having said that, I do think the theory that Dennis and Ann of Ingleby/Repton moved to Stoke (Coventry) is possible. I initially assumed it was the usual name-matching nonsense but it fits better than that.

There is some confusion between dates 1588/89 for Repton. The register or a transcript must exist as FreeREG transcribed it but I can't see it on FindMyPast. Getting access to a copy would help tidy up the Repton end.

Dennis is described as 'esquire' which was more than just a courtesy title. Admittedly it was already slipping into casual usage and there was a roaring trade in fictitious pedigrees for successful men who wanted it. Nevertheless he was probably a landowner and a man of some wealth. It might be possible to look at land ownership records in the area and see if there were any links with Repton or Pratts.

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